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Pop quiz: What’s the name of the big Marine Corps base in Onslow County? Camp Lejeune, right?

It seems the folks around a North Carolina Marine Corps base have been mispronouncing its name for years. The last name of the 13th commandant for whom the base is name is pronounced luh-JURN’ and not luh-JUNE’.

Former Marine Patrick Brent is coming to the base Friday to give a class to local reporters on just how to say General John A. Lejeune’s name. Brent, a friend of the Lejeune family in Louisiana, says it is disrespectful to not pronounce the general’s name properly.

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24 Comments on "Have you been pronouncing Camp Lejeune correctly?"


Anonymous
2015 years 9 months ago

Maybe, just maybe, when the LeJeune family came to America, all the REDNECKS and HICKS in Jacksonville, NC had trouble pronoucing it the right way.

“Whats yur name boh? LejuuRRRn? Well, welcome tuh Amurka….”

Marie
2015 years 9 months ago

I think with all the military cuts that are currently happening money could be better spent than worry about how Camp Lejune is pronouce. But that common sense and we all know that the government doesn’t much of that.

Cory leJeune
2015 years 9 months ago

Howdy folks. First off, I fully understand the respect that is due to the late Lt. General Lejeune, and he deserves that respect for great reason, and certainly has mine.

Anyway, regarding the name: my last name is leJeune. in my name the l is small and the J is capitalized. in others both the l and j are capitalized and some separate the two words.

Besides losing General Lejeune, we also recently lost the great Robin Williams. Since then EPIX, CMT, and other channels have been running many of his movies. And this article and the following comments makes me think of Nathan Lane saying “We never know where we are until we hear our last name pronounced” in the Birdcage. lol

here In Texas, I’m “La June” like the month. my relatives in Quebec and Louisiana pronounce it more French sounding….the more closer to the culture they are, themore French it sounds. anyway, in French the “r” we’re talking about here is almost like the “r” sound at the end of an english word but pronouned by brits, georgians, aussies,(like “buttah” for butter or “cah” for car like in boston, etc) etc: it’s a sort of “uh” sound. there is no actual R sound in the name because R’s in french are said with the back of the throat and non native french speakers have a real rough time of pronouncing it: I can do it, but also grw up with french and english. My dear wife grew up with english and spanish and she can’t, just like I can’t properly say the spanish slightly rolled r sound.

anyway, the “proper pronunciation” is “Luh Zhurhn.” (the zh is like zsa zsa gabor’s name and this is the closest phonetic spelling i can do). my family call ourselves “luh zhoon” my friends call me “la Joon,” and to be honest i could care less either way. and now for that dastardly r…..

anyway, folks, it’s “luh zhurhn.” the “r” is like an english r… and also with a lott of non english surnames, there’s been lots of bastardized spellings, reclaimings of ethnicity of frenchness, and back again, bblah blah blah.

but….it’s “camp luh zhuhn” (and say the h in teh zhuhn part like youre ABOUT to say an r….but dont quite get there.

……..anyone else think this is like “how do you say sade?” and on the record cover it said “shar day.” so we americans called her SHARRRR day…..but tot he brits the r was an h…..same thing here.

and thouh i have great respect for the name AND my own family history as a cajun on my dad’s side and french canadian on my mom’s side… this is a non issue, non story, and the only reason i even wrote a comment is cuz i had a migraine earlier, took a painkiller, so am a tad high right now. lol

teute a l’heure, mes amis! ouais, je viens d’escrive cette. :) PAIX!

Patrick Brent
2015 years 9 months ago

Good comments

Like to chat sometime

PATRICK BRENT

Hawaii

JD
2015 years 9 months ago

Umm, I come from the Lejeune lineage, the same lineage in fact, through Acadia to Louisiana back to our arrival in North America. There is no R sound in the name going back centuries. so….huh?

 

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