make WWAY your homepage  Become a fan on facebook  Follow us on twitter  Receive RSS Newsfeeds  MEMBERS: Register | Login

MLK march celebrates equality and unity

READ MORE: MLK march celebrates equality and unity

WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) -- Folks in Southport say it's never too early to celebrate the many accomplishments of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. "We honor a great American," says Ivory Parker. "We honor a great person."

People gathered at the International Longshoremen's Association building in Southport on Sunday to celebrate the many contributions of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The group made their way around the community with banners and singing songs, celebrating the freedom they say Dr. King made possible. Ivory Parker says she was a part of the struggle and she thinks it's important to teach younger generations about what Dr. King fought for.

"The youth today do not know what their forefathers went through just to be able to have equal rights," says Parker. "I think it's important (for them to learn about the past) so we will not repeat that."

Nine-year-old Dayshon Lee says he appreciates the social changes Dr. King motivated throughout the world and he is excited to march with his friends and family to celebrate.

"It's pretty fun because for me I get to witness something that I haven't before," says Dayshon. "This is my second year doing the march and I've marched a few times, six blocks."

Dayson says he has heard how Dr. King fought for equality and he is happy he has an opportunity to show his support and gratitude.

"We can go march with these people today," says Dayshon, "because we can do stuff for Martin Luther King because he did stuff for us to make equal rights."

Disclaimer: Comments posted on this, or any story are opinions of those people posting them, and not the views or opinions of WWAY NewsChannel 3, its management or employees. You can view our comment policy here.

»

I learned something about Doctor King today...

...thanks to his niece.

Doctor King was Pro-Life and totally opposed to abortion. If more people knew that, Congress would probably do away with his national holiday.

He also felt that some of the biggest dangers facing the Black community were promiscuity, illegitimate births and single parent (a.k.a, mom) households. My God, what would he say if he were alive now? What is it now - Two out of three births in the Black community are illegitimate?

King never adopted the "victim mentality" that is now the hallmark of Black leaders such as Sharpton and Jackson. I believe that the community would do better to follow the teachings of King (regarding basic morals, though God knows he had his failings), Roy Innis (regarding individual responsibility and self-reliance), Marcus Garvey (regarding the Black Community as an entity unto itself and looking out for itself) and even Malcolm X (regarding self-destructive behavior), than listen to Sharpton, Jackson, and even King's own children.