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Associated Press

RALEIGH, NC (AP) — A senior adviser to North Carolina Gov. Bev Perdue says he regrets how changes to letters under a Department of Transportation executive’s signature were handled, but he says there was no attempt to deliberately mislead lawmakers.

Pryor Gibson told the Senate Rules Committee on Thursday he thought the letters sent to legislators last week about funding for two toll road projects were accurate when they were sent. Gibson and a Perdue staff attorney had made changes to a draft by DOT Chief Operating Officer Jim Trogdon.

Trogdon’s digital signature was placed on the final letters. He later retracted their contents as they appeared to reverse his earlier memo on project funding.

Committee chairman Sen. Tom Apodaca said the panel would meet next week to decide to do next in the investigation.

(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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3 Comments on "Perdue aide speaks to NC Senate panel over letters"

2015 years 10 months ago

Dirtier than Easley. Can’t wait for the prosecutions to begin when she leaves office.

2015 years 10 months ago

In my opinion no one should have access to someone else’s electronic signature. If they were not intending to mislead lawmakers why did they not send the letter back with the proposed changes instead of passing it along to the intended recipients. Definitely something fishy going on.

2015 years 10 months ago

Here again– we have N.C. Govt. Officials and State Politicians who can’t even ballance their own check books – let alone have a clue as to how to effectively manage State Fundings. Like a run-away snow ball — it will get bigger and bigger and out of control ! Our State govt. is definitely out of control with their expenses – and to employ a Toll Road around Cary, N.C. is their : ” Quick fix” hot solution. We Can and Wil elect better qualified people to serve the best interests in North Carolina for 2012.


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