NC school board considering abstinence grants for Bladen, Duplin Co.
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RALEIGH, NC (AP) -- North Carolina's school board is expected to distribute about $800,000 to 19 rural public school districts to help teach children to abstain from sex.

The State Board of Education is scheduled to decide Thursday on a plan to distribute the federal money that will focus on students in grades 4 through 6 who are at increased risk for bearing children out of wedlock and academic failure.

A little-known feature of the federal health overhaul law commonly called "Obamacare" extends through next year the program that distributes money to states to teach abstinence education.

The school systems are in Alleghany, Anson, Ashe, Bertie, Bladen, Caldwell, Duplin, Edenton/Chowan, Edgecombe, Greene, Halifax, Lee, Lenoir, Richmond, Robeson, Scotland, and Swain counties. The two others eligible are Nash/Rocky Mount Schools and Robeson County Charter School.

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No wonder we're ranking in the bottom of education worldwide when our schools are wasting time on this nonsense. This is the job of PARENTS, not schools.

Good luck with that, lol---

of the parents.

In former years, this was not necessary. Parents taught the applicable lessons, and morality, at home.

There were no rampant outbreaks of junior high and high school teen pregnancies.

force the parents to do the parenting. Hold them accountable.

Tom, I enjoy your posts but you are off on this one. Teen pregnancy rates in 2010 were lowered than any year since the 1940's. Teen pregnancy rates have been falling since peaking in the late 1950's and early 1960's. There was a much higher rate of teen pregnancy in former years as parents were not teaching the applicable lessons.

Sex was rarely discussed and there was no mention of birth control or contraception in the 1950's. Only when we have open and honest discussions about sex will students have the education to prevent unwanted pregnancies. Kids are going to have sex so let's do what we can to make them responsible people.

Abstinence programs might look and sound good but numerous studies have shown they have no effect on teen pregnancy rates. Kids in abstinence only programs did not delay sex any more than others who were not in the program.

I grew up in a school that only taught abstinence. I can only remember two girls getting pregnant.

In years past, parents had a much stronger moral compass that they used to raise their kids. The kids inherited that compass. Very few failed to use it and when they did fail they considered themselves to be an embarrassment to themselves, their parents, and their families.
The sexual revolution of the 60s has lead to degree of freedoms that younger kids don't understand. Freedom DOES come with responsibility.
But abstinence? If you accept the premise that kids can be responsible abstinence may work, but given the numbers of unwed pregnancies it's apparent that we might be better off distributing condoms.
Abstinence does work for those with a strong sense of morality - but those kids are few and far between these days it seems.

Vog