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WWAY's Monday night sports - September 9

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WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) -- We invite you to follow WWAY Sports on Twitter @WWAYSports.

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LANDOVER, MD (AP) - Michael Vick threw for two touchdowns and ran for another, LeSean McCoy ran for 184 yards, and the Philadelphia Eagles unleashed coach Chip Kelly's frenetic offense on the NFL on Monday night with a 33-27 win over the Washington Redskins.

Vick hit DeSean Jackson for a 25-yard TD and Brent Celek for a 28-yard score, then found the end zone himself on a 3-yard run - and that was just the first half. The Eagles led 33-7 late in the third quarter before three Redskins touchdowns made the score respectable.

Perhaps the most remarkable accomplishment by the Eagles: They managed to upstage Robert Griffin III. Griffin threw a career-high two interceptions in a game played eight months to the day since he had major knee surgery.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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Note: Former UNCW pitcher Chris Hatcher pitched the 9th inning for Miami. Hatched faced three batters. It was 3 up 3 down.

MIAMI (AP) - Evan Gattis drove in two runs to highlight Atlanta's highest-scoring inning in more than a month, and the Braves snapped a four-game slide by beating the Miami Marlins 5-2 on Monday night.

Justin Upton, Freddie Freeman and Gattis all doubled to lead off what became a five-run fourth, Atlanta's biggest inning since a five-run fifth against Philadelphia on Aug. 2. Kris Medlen (13-12) was the beneficiary that night against the Phillies and again on Monday, getting the win after allowing six hits and two runs in 6 1-3 innings.

Atlanta (86-57) passed idle Boston (87-58) for baseball's best record.

Chris Coghlan tied a career high with four hits for Miami, which lost for the 24th time in its last 34 games. Ed Lucas added a two-run double in the seventh for the Marlins.

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CONCORD, NC (AP) - Ryan Newman is replacing Martin Truex Jr. in the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship as part of NASCAR'S penalties against Michael Waltrip Racing for manipulating the outcome of last weekend's race at Richmond.

Two independent people familiar with the situation described the penalties to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because NASCAR had yet to announce its decision. The governing body had scheduled a news conference for Monday night.

Michael Waltrip Racing has been fined $300,000, and general manager Ty Norris is suspended indefinitely. Truex, Clint Bowyer and Brian Vickers have been docked 50 points apiece.

The action by NASCAR is a result of Bowyer intentionally spinning with seven laps remaining to bring out a caution with Newman leading Saturday night. Newman was racing Truex for the final spot in the 12-driver Chase field.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) - The Panthers announced that starting right guard Garry Williams has torn the ACL and MCL in his left knee and will miss the remainder of the season.

The news came Monday shortly after coach Ron Rivera addressed the media at his weekly press conference.

The injury occurred in the first half of Carolina's 12-7 loss to Seattle after a Seahawks defensive lineman rolled up on Williams' leg.

The five-year pro won the starting right guard spot in training camp prompting the Panthers to release veteran guard Geoff Hangartner.

Rivera said earlier Chris Scott would likely replace Williams at right guard.

It's Williams' second major injury.

He broke his ankle in Carolina's final preseason game in 2011 after earning a starting spot earlier that summer.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) -- The 4th Annual United Way Fall Fundraiser presented by the Corning Disc League will be held on Saturday, September 14th at Castle Hayne Park in New Hanover County. Registration will start at 8am. The one-day, two-round tourney begins around 9:15am.

FIVE DIVISIONS
1. Open/Pro
2. Women
3. Youth (14 and under)
4. Amateurs
5. CUS1 - Recreational/Novice

Open/Pro and Amateurs will play a modified layout called "Reverse the Payne".
Rec/Novice, Women and Youth will play a slightly shorter Par 3 "Reverse the Payne" layout.
Pros will be awarded cash based on 50% of Pro registrations.
Ams, Rec/Novice, Women's and Youth Division winners will be awarded Gift Cards and prizes from local Sponsors.

Registration for the event is $25 and includes: 2 Champ Innova Glow discs, Drawstring Bag, and a water bottle. The first 75 paid Registrations receive player packs.
The field is limited to 90 players, however only the first 75 paid Registrations receive player packs. Open to all age and skill levels. Multiple prizes will be awarded.
All proceeds to benefit the Cape Fear United Way!

For information, email calkinbj@corning.com or check out this website: http://www.corningdiscleague.com/

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NEW YORK (AP) -- Hard to believe this is the same Rafael Nadal who was home during the US Open a year ago, nursing a bad left knee.

Hard to believe this is the guy sent packing in the first round of Wimbledon in June, losing against someone ranked 135th.

More 2013 US Open Coverage

This was a comeback that was astonishing by even Rafael Nadal's own absurdly high standards, Greg Garber writes. Story

Novak Djokovic lost the match, but he brought the crowd to its feet with an incredible rally, writes Jane McManus. Story

Looking fit as can be and maybe even better than ever, the No. 2-ranked Nadal pulled away from No. 1 Novak Djokovic 6-2, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1 on Monday in a taut, tense US Open final for his 13th Grand Slam title.

"This is probably the most emotional one in my career," Nadal said. "I know I had to be almost perfect to win."

They started in sunlight and finished at night, a 3-hour, 21-minute miniseries of cliffhangers and plot twists and a pair of protagonists who inspired standing ovations in the middle of games.

"Probably nobody brings my game to the limit like Novak," said Nadal, who collected $3.6 million in prize money, including a $1 million bonus for results during the North American hard-court circuit.

There was no quit in either of them, during points that lasted 15, 25, even more than 50 strokes. Those rallies went so long, rarely over when they appeared to be, and spectators often shouted out during the course of play, prompting Nadal to complain to the chair umpire.

This was their 37th match against each other, the most between any two men in the Open era, and Nadal has won 22. It also was their third head-to-head US Open final in the last four years. Nadal beat Djokovic for the 2010 title, and Djokovic won their rematch in 2011.

They know each other's games so well, and play such similar hustle-to-every-ball styles, but in the end, it was Nadal who was superior.

"He was too good. He definitely deserved to win this match today and this trophy," Djokovic said. "Obviously disappointing to lose a match like this."

Nadal improved to 22-0 on hard courts and 60-3 overall in 2013 with 10 titles, including at the French Open, which made him the first man with at least one Grand Slam trophy in nine consecutive seasons. The 27-year-old Spaniard's total of 13 major championships ranks third in the history of men's tennis, behind only Roger Federer's 17 and Pete Sampras' 14.

Nadal has won a record eight titles at the French Open, two each at the US Open and Wimbledon, and one at the Australian Open.

"Thirteen Grand Slams for a guy who is 27 years old is incredible," said Djokovic, who owns six himself. "Whatever he achieved so far in his career, everybody should respect, no question about it."

Nadal no longer wears the strips of white tape he once did to bolster his left knee, and the way he covered the court against Djokovic -- switching from defense to offense in a blink -- proved that while he says he still feels pain in that leg, he definitely does not have problems moving around.

He was off the tour for about seven months, missing the London Olympics and US Open last year, and the Australian Open this year.

"The hardest part is the pain, always," Toni Nadal, Rafael's uncle and coach, told The Associated Press. "You have pain, and you play. But the problem is you never know if you can run so fast, like before, or if you can play against the best players. From one day to (the next), it's difficult, always."

Nadal sure has managed to hide it well. He improved to 8-3 against Djokovic in Grand Slam matches, including a thriller of a semifinal at the French Open, which Nadal won 9-7 in the fifth set after trailing.

These two also played the longest Grand Slam final in history, a nearly six-hour struggle that left both needing to sit in chairs during the ceremony after Djokovic's victory at the 2012 Australian Open.

This time, when it ended with a forehand into the net by Djokovic, Nadal dropped to his back on the court, saluted by an Arthur Ashe Stadium crowd that included the Queen of Spain.

Nadal was relentless from shot to shot, yes, and from point to point, too, but what might have been most impressive was the way he stayed steady when Djokovic recovered from a rough start and began asserting himself.

At the outset, Djokovic was his own worst enemy on many points, a touch or two off the mark. Nadal claimed 12 of the last 14 points in the first set, with Djokovic looking almost bored.

The world saw this sort of listless, lackluster Djokovic two months ago in the final at Wimbledon, where Nadal had exited a Grand Slam tournament in the opening round for the only time in his career. That time, Djokovic went through a difficult semifinal -- at 4:43, the longest in Wimbledon history -- and barely put up much resistance in a straight-set loss to Andy Murray two days later.

In New York, Djokovic was coming off another four-hour semifinal victory, and the key stat in the first set Monday was that he made 14 unforced errors, 10 more than Nadal.

[+] EnlargeNadal
Jerry Lai/USA TODAY Sports Rafael Nadal capped a sensational 2013 with his second US Open title.

There were no surprising or innovative tactics from Nadal. In the simplest of terms, he reached nearly every ball Djokovic delivered, and Nadal's replies nearly never missed the intended spot, accented by his huge uppercut of a swing and loud grunts of "Aaaah!" By match's end, Djokovic had made 53 unforced errors, Nadal only 20.

"Credit to my opponent. He was making me run," said Djokovic, who won the Australian Open in January and will remain No. 1 in the rankings despite Monday's loss. "I had my ups and downs."

The Serb's biggest ups came in the second set. Nadal was broken a grand total of once through his first six matches in the tournament -- a string that reached 88 games by early in the final's second set. But with Djokovic raising his level, and gaining control of more of the many extended exchanges, he broke Nadal three times in a row.

"When Novak plays (at) that level," Nadal said, "I'm not sure if (anybody can) stop him."

The first came for a 4-2 lead in the second set, thanks to the crescendo of the longest point of these two weeks, which ended when Nadal's backhand found the net on the 55th stroke. Djokovic used superb defense to elongate the point, tossing his body around to bail himself out repeatedly by blunting Nadal's violent strokes. When the memorable point ended, Djokovic bellowed and raised both arms, and thousands of fans rose to their feet, chanting his nickname, "No-le! No-le!"

Now Djokovic was energized, and Nadal was suddenly in a tad of trouble.

"Djokovic was so good in the second set and the third. But Rafael was always there, there, there. And in the end, he won," Toni Nadal said. "He was so strong in his mind. That was the difference."

The final momentum shift came with Nadal serving at 4-all in the third set. Djokovic earned three break points, thanks in part to a tremendous lob-volley and another point when Nadal slipped and tumbled to his backside.

But a quick forehand winner by Nadal, a forehand into the net by Djokovic on a 22-stroke point, and a 125 mph ace -- Nadal's only one of the evening, it drew shouts of "Vamos!" from Uncle Toni -- helped avoid another break.

"I didn't do anything I felt (was) wrong in these few points," Djokovic said. "He didn't make a mistake."

In the very next game, Nadal broke Djokovic's serve and, apparently, his will. When that set ended with Djokovic pushing a forehand long on a 19-shot point, Nadal screamed as he knelt down at the baseline, his racket on the court and his left fist pumping over and over and over.

"A really important set," Nadal called it later, "and a really special one."

Djokovic made one last serious stand, holding break points in the fourth set's first game, but Nadal saved those, then immediately broke to go ahead 2-0.

Once again, Nadal withstood Djokovic's best and was on his way to another Grand Slam celebration.

"It's what we do when we play against each other, always pushing each other to the limit," Djokovic said. "That's the beauty of our matches and our rivalry, I guess, in the end."

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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