Long, cold winter could mean especially bad allergy season

WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) -- That light yellow dusting on your windshield is a sure sign spring is here, and so is allergy season. This year it could be worse than usual.

"This year, the pollen has been really bad," allergy sufferer Sarah Hooker said. "I never really had allergies till I moved to Wilmington."

Seasonal allergies are an issue for Hooker and her son Henry. She's lived in Wilmington for ten years and says this spring, her symptoms are worse than ever.

"I don't think I've had anything like this year yet," she said.

That's because this year's harsh winter left plants dormant longer than usual causing pollen to come in at a higher concentration.

"More things are pollenating right now, so we have a lot more different variety out there in addition to the trees," National Weather Service meteorologist Steven Pfaff said.

He says it does not look like allergy sufferers will be seeing relief any time soon.

Hooker knows the feeling.

"It's just like having a cold all the time pretty much," Hooker said. "You just have a runny nose, you have junk in your throat."

If you think your allergies are bad now, once the wind kicks in, it's gonna get worse.

"That's actually dispersing it, making it pretty miserable," Pfaff said.

Right now flowering trees are the main cause of the yellow stuff on your windshield, and it looks like it'll be there until we get some rain.

"We need the rainfall to help get that pollen out of the air not just a light rainfall," Pfaff said. "We need a good soaking rain."

Until then, everyone should keep their tissues handy.

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Not to mention the dying bee population. Without our bees pollen can, and is, running rampant. Pop quiz: In the famous "Bee Movie" what happens when the bees are not there to pollinate?

or not to bee, that is the question :)