make WWAY your homepage  Become a fan on facebook  Follow us on twitter  Receive RSS Newsfeeds  MEMBERS: Register | Login

With tax incentives still in doubt, Wilmywood busy as ever

READ MORE:
 

WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) -- State lawmakers may not be sure about the future of North Carolina's film incentives, but filmmakers appear to be pretty happy with them right now, as several productions are busy shooting around town.

Wilmywood is really living up to its name.

"It's cool to live in a town where a lot of movies are shot," CFCC student Aaron Holtzclaw said.

Another CFCC student agrees.

"Last weekend I saw Michael Cera sitting at the Basics. That was pretty cool," Shaun Braswell said. "I heard he's filming a show here."

Cera's F/X pilot "How & Why" is one of four projects using the Port City as their backdrop.

The TV movie "The Sin Seer" is another happy to have found a home in Wilmington.

"The culture and history here is so distinctive, and the backdrop was just beautiful," writer/director Paul Hannah said. "You know you can just drive down a regular road, and you know you'd have to create that in LA."

Production for "Max Steel" blocked off some of downtown this afternoon.

Rhonda Bellamy, the executive director of the Wilmington Arts Council, says it's booming right now and definitely something to be proud of.

"The film industry is such an integral part of what Wilmington is now," Bellamy said.

The industry is responsible for hundreds of local jobs. That's why folks are concerned with future film incentive legislation.

"When you have industry, and you have commerce in your area, you need to work hard on keeping it in your area, so they need to work real hard on keeping the film industry here," Kevin Brown of Wilmington said.

And that's what the Arts Council Board of Directors are pushing for. They're going to Raleigh to let state lawmakers know where they stand.

"We support filmmaking here in Wilmington and realize the value of what it brings to our local economy."

The TV show "Under the Dome" has been shooting its second season around town for weeks. "Sleepy Hollow" returns for its second season next week.

Disclaimer: Comments posted on this, or any story are opinions of those people posting them, and not the views or opinions of WWAY NewsChannel 3, its management or employees. You can view our comment policy here.

»

All programs

at state level are at risk. From another local news outlet:

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) - State budget analysts believe the state will face a roughly $450 million revenue shortfall when the fiscal year ends June 30.

A memo from the General Assembly and the state budget office obtained by The Associated Press says tax collections are expected to fall 2 percent below expectations, or $445 million. The adjustment disclosed Friday is based in part on April 15 tax filings.

The revenue downgrade is attributed to slower than expected income tax withholdings, timing issues from last year's tax overhaul and the response of taxpayers to federal tax increases in 2013.

The news means it could be harder for legislators to approve raises for teachers and state employees next year beyond already proposed raises for early-career teachers.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.
**********************************************
$445M is not that much if you "Marginalize" it.
But when teachers want more - our infrastructure needs work - people are still unemployed - we need beach sand - our state buildings look like crap - our state computer systems are outdated - all of these are necessities, yet film supporters want what they feel is "theirs".
Losing 81 cents on every dollar is not my idea of a good investment. Appointing 20 somethings to $80K per year jobs (or giving huge pay raises to your cronies) likewise, is not a good investment.
ANY private company losing 81 cents on a dollar would terminate that program or project.
The state should do the same with this. Quite frankly the film supporters have raised the argument that the approaching sunset would "Kill" the industry - when in fact they are busy right now. They say that doing away with incentives would END all filming, yet their own industry publications say thats not so.
Just like the stadium supporters here did. YOU used highly inflated IMPLAN multipliers that have been proven wrong time, and time, and time again. You then tried to marginalize the the tax burden (remember it will only cost a cup of coffee?). You then argued that ending the corporate tax was OK because NC replaced it with a sales tax - a tax that has been in this state since 1939. Finally you tried to say that all commerce would stop - like down town would fall to pieces.
This is all posturing and fear mongering.
I SUPPORT filming here - we have talented people, a great studio, and beautiful scenery here.
But we, the taxpayers should not subsidize any business.

Vog

And here comes the reason

for camcelling film incentives:

" State budget analysts believe the state will face a roughly $450 million revenue shortfall when the fiscal year ends June 30.

A memo from the General Assembly and the state budget office obtained by The Associated Press says tax collections are expected to fall 2 percent below expectations, or $445 million. The adjustment disclosed Friday is based in part on April 15 tax filings.

The revenue downgrade is attributed to slower than expected income tax withholdings, timing issues from last year's tax overhaul and the response of taxpayers to federal tax increases in 2013.

The news means it could be harder for legislators to approve raises for teachers and state employees next year beyond already proposed raises for early-career teachers. "

You can marginalize all you want - you are REALLY socializing the losses. The state loses 81 cents on every dollar.
Given the news above do you think they'll keep incentives?

Again, they are politicians so nothing they do will surprise me.
But my guess is this picture may get worse before it gets better so ALL programs will get cuts

Vog

WHERE'S PAT???

Governor McCrory, do you or don’t you stand with North Carolina's film industry?

When you recently endorsed Thom Tillis for U.S. Senate, you declared: "That's the type of leader I am. I tell people exactly where I stand on the issue."

So show the people of North Carolina exactly where you stand on the question of whether to keep our state's thriving film industry. The good people of New Hanover and Brunswick Counties are watching closely, with 2016 firmly in mind.

"whether to keep our state's thriving film industry"

By thriving, you must be referring to the fat cats in Hollywood who are pocketing the free NC handouts because NC's not thriving from this program; it's losing money.

You're obviously an industry insider who cares only about the film business and your own paycheck because you sure don't seem to give a crap about anyone other than yourself.

the State economy

has still not recovered from the recession and years of Democratic fiscal mismanagement. To make things worse tax cuts have made revenue projection look very shaky over the next two years. The Council of state has already been told to prepare for more budget cuts.
That being said programs that result in LOSSES for the state will be scrutinized closely - especially when even Republicans say its time raise teacher pay.
You can "marginalize" all you want and break it down to pennies for each taxpayer - the problem here is that its a money loser for the state.
film company's pay NO CORPORATE TAXES already and they are getting paid to do their jobs. THEN they make millions of of distribution dollars that escape NC taxation.
Yes other states do offer incentives - we do not have the market cornered on stupidity here. We have two state studies that show they lose money, multiple state auditors that have shown they lose money elsewhere, measuring ACTUAL dollars generated, and study after study from private sources that say the same thing.
The ONLY studies that say filming is profitable are those done by or paid for by the MPAA. there are no independent studies that confirm what MPAA has said.
The recent discussions is film friendly states like SC and GA are indicating that support for film incentives is waning as more and more state determine this is a race to the bottom.
Filming was here before incentives, and film industry sources themselves indicate that filming doesn't disappear when incentives are stopped.
Finally - it is not a function of state government to favor one industry over another. NC has given filming the same breaks we have given company's like Duke - yet film supporters say thats not enough.
They never talk about costs of filming - the sporadic unemployment, the costs to local municipalities etc......
They just want more.....and are using fear mongering over "job loss" to pressure politicians into passing the incentive package.
This is corporate welfare at its best.
And Republicans are politicians just like Dems are - so nothing they do would surprise me.............

Vog

you are gonna love this.

About that study: http://goo.gl/kb8OmV

VOG

you hit the nail right on the head. You've repeatedly given specifics. But to no avail.

Not 1 proponent can produce a simple to read, easy to understand rebuttal to opponents so those not involved in the film industry can see the light.

They can not do it. And sadly, they won't admit they can not.

They're having a rally this week-end in Wilmington. Whoopie.

As you noted previously, it's the legislators, whose local districts are not impacted by the movie industry, who will control the outcome.

So to step ahead, with the short term about to begin, ask the proponents this:

The state has a finite number of dollars available. Where to spend them? Education? OR Movie Incentives? OR Thug Control as Cheatham would have us do? Can not do all; there's not enough money. So make a choice.

With elections coming up, any reasonably thinking person can make a strong prediction.

But I think a legislator from the Triad or Raleigh, concerned about his election prospects is going to double down on Education.

Movie Money

Spot on Vog!
besides the movie industry is trying to leave California all together with their outrageous taxes and regulatory ridiculousness.
Just like Toyota leaving Southern California For Texas. Any company that wants to actually make a profit will be forced to leave.
That is what this state should be targeting not paying someone to come here and shoot a movie and leave.
Move your whole operation here I would agree with some incentives (in the form of an actual tax break) if we could collect taxes on distribution and all the other aspects of the industry.
But just to show up for a short time put a movie in a can and then rake in the dough for someplace else I don't think so.