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NC Film Office director steps down

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By Hunter Ingram
Hunter.Ingram@StarNewsOnline.com

Amid continued deliberation about the future of the state's film incentive program, the N.C. Film Office will soon face the loss of its leader.

Aaron Syrett, director of the film office, confirmed Tuesday that he will step down from the position July 31.

In recent months, film industry recruitment and retention, the main focus of the film office, has been named as one of the many functions Gov. Pat McCrory's administration wants to oversee under the N.C. Partnership for Economic Development, a new public-private partnership that will work in tandem with state government.

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Thank you, Aaron!

Thank you for your commitment to NC's film industry, Aaron Syrett. What Dino Di Laurentiis and Frank Capra forged in the the 1980's, you've helped to build upon up until 2014.

30 years of a vital, vibrant, clean industry and our Governor, along with local Representatives Rick Catlin and Chris Millis, have managed to dismantle and sell out to neighboring states in merely 18 months.

Wilmington will soon have Titan Cement and Lord knows what other polluting, low-paying jobs to fill the void left by the talented crew and vendors who will no longer be welcome in their home state.

If......

Mr Syrett did his job then .will continue here in spite of changes to the incentive program, just like they have in other states that have eliminated reduced or capped incentives.
Your continued use of doomsday scenario's has been proven wrong by your own industry, yet you refuse to admit it. You have embarrased yourself enough.

Gov McCrory has inherited a state that was hit hard by the down turn. HIs record of job losses is the worst of any Gov in the SE, but there are glimmers of hope I believe. But given the number of NC job losses and the industry numbers which show that not ALL jobs will be lost in FILM then you have vastly over stated your importance to this state.
If 1000 jobs leave because of this so be it. There was NO OUTCRY by film supporters when DAK closed, NONE when Corning laid off, nor when INvista shut down production lines.
There was dead silence from you guys. Quite frankly you folks appear to be self centered, spoiled rotten entitlement grabbing hacks who can't make it without government assistance! In today's political environment that is the direct opposite of how you SHOULD appear to the public !!!!
Grow up, be SUPPORTIVE of the changes proposed and work in the future to change them back hen times are better.......

Vog

Jeepers

"They won't give us what we want - so I'm going home!!!!!!!"

Really?
State government employees have suffered with no pay raises and cut budgets for years but shoulder on and you have the audacity to do this?
I hate to say this but state government employees are showing MORE professionalism than you and the film industry supporters are.
Now THAT is saying a LOT.........

Vog

Triple Jeepers!

The most recent numbers on theater attendance shows all movies are tanking. Revenues, attendance all 30-40% down from last year alone. First, very few decent movies are being produced. People get tired of paying big bucks to see a movie that puts them to sleep or makes them want to walk out. Family night at the movies is an outrageously expensive venture and cost prohibitive for the average family. As far as I'm concerned, they're cutting their own throat. I wondered when this was going to happen, now I have the answer.

Now if everyone would follow my lead, buy a digital antenna (to get 14+ channels), hookup a Roku 3 and stream their entertainment from Netflix and Amazon, we can make a serious point to the cable companies as well. They can begin to price reasonably or go out of business. I'm saving over 120 clams a month and enjoy what I watch much better (all in HD too!)! Best move I've made in years!

Reply to Triple Jeepers...

I think it is great that you have managed to keep your cost down; however, may I point out that you are still watching film and television. Where do you think these films come from? So, we allow states like Georgia, Louisiana, and South Carolina who are providing incentives to the film industry to reap the benefits?

The incentive does not just provide jobs to those who are actors in the North Carolina area; but, the money filters through the community into businesses like hotels, restaurants, grocery stores, lumber companies, electrical supply stores, beauty salons, doctors' offices, department stores, local law enforcements, local communities for location shoots, local residents whose homes are used for filming, caterers, and the list could go on forever. I don't think people realize just how much money is spent in the local areas to do a film above and beyond that North Carolina businesses reap. This is money lost to them. There are electricians, carpenters, HVAC, artists, hairdressers, truck drivers, handymen, and many more jobs that are included in the industry that are also being lost. You people just think of actors, directors, and producers.

Tourism is another factor that you don't look at when you look at the bigger picture. People want to visit the spots where things are filmed. They want to visit a studio and see how things are filmed.

We have great film schools here and our children grow as well as study in this industry. Now we are setting back our state to the 1970's when they wanted to leave to go where they could work instead of staying here where they could achieve their goals of being in the film industry; which, is there chosen profession. We will lose talented artists as well as people with undeniable computer talent to other states. We are sitting ourselves back instead of looking to the future. I wonder if it is worth the incentive to lose our greatest assets.

We give Duke Energy a $300 million incentive and they haven't paid taxes in over 10 years; yet, you complain about a $34 million incentive to the film industry. What Duke costs us in the long run with environmental issues will cost us long into the future billions in clean-up that we have let slide. I hear no complaint about that.

You have realize that an incentive is just a percentage of their own money being returned to them for bringing business here. It is not money that is taken from us nor is it placing additional taxes on us; so, we should have no complaint. They had to at least spend $250,000 not counting salary for actors in the state before they could receive the incentive. That's $250,000 in all types of services in our state that is now going to be lost.

So, whether the film goes to Netflix, Amazon, or any other media that you choose to use the film still has to be made. So, why not make it in North Carolina?

Reply to Triple Jeepers...

I think it is great that you have managed to keep your cost down; however, may I point out that you are still watching film and television. Where do you think these films come from? So, we allow states like Georgia, Louisiana, and South Carolina who are providing incentives to the film industry to reap the benefits?

The incentive does not just provide jobs to those who are actors in the North Carolina area; but, the money filters through the community into businesses like hotels, restaurants, grocery stores, lumber companies, electrical supply stores, beauty salons, doctors' offices, department stores, local law enforcements, local communities for location shoots, local residents whose homes are used for filming, caterers, and the list could go on forever. I don't think people realize just how much money is spent in the local areas to do a film above and beyond that North Carolina businesses reap. This is money lost to them. There are electricians, carpenters, HVAC, artists, hairdressers, truck drivers, handymen, and many more jobs that are included in the industry that are also being lost. You people just think of actors, directors, and producers.

Tourism is another factor that you don't look at when you look at the bigger picture. People want to visit the spots where things are filmed. They want to visit a studio and see how things are filmed.

We have great film schools here and our children grow as well as study in this industry. Now we are setting back our state to the 1970's when they wanted to leave to go where they could work instead of staying here where they could achieve their goals of being in the film industry; which, is there chosen profession. We will lose talented artists as well as people with undeniable computer talent to other states. We are sitting ourselves back instead of looking to the future. I wonder if it is worth the incentive to lose our greatest assets.

We give Duke Energy a $300 million incentive and they haven't paid taxes in over 10 years; yet, you complain about a $34 million incentive to the film industry. What Duke costs us in the long run with environmental issues will cost us long into the future billions in clean-up that we have let slide. I hear no complaint about that.

You have realize that an incentive is just a percentage of their own money being returned to them for bringing business here. It is not money that is taken from us nor is it placing additional taxes on us; so, we should have no complaint. They had to at least spend $250,000 not counting salary for actors in the state before they could receive the incentive. That's $250,000 in all types of services in our state that is now going to be lost.

So, whether the film goes to Netflix, Amazon, or any other media that you choose to use the film still has to be made. So, why not make it in North Carolina?