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Fire near St. James Plantation

READ MORE: Fire near St. James Plantation
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A fire quickly burned and spread through 50 acres of land Tuesday afternoon in Brunswick County. The fire was self contained, but earlier Tuesday the visibility in the area was low. Highway 211 was closed at 2:30 p.m., because at the time the biggest concern was the fire jumping the highway. Four plows and two spotter planes were called in and there was one plane flying over the area carrying buckets of water. They evacuated the visitors’ center of St. James Plantation Tuesday afternoon. The fire has been self contained, but they expect it to keep burning through the night. Their biggest concern for the morning is fog and smoke in this area making driving conditions potentially dangerous. Assistant Fire Chief, John Dahill, said it all started with a control fire that got out of control. “It is really dangerous situation. This happened within 15 to 20 minutes. I'm sure they felt they had it under control, the wind whipped up they had nothing they could do other than if they had not been burning in the first place.” Brunswick Electric was here earlier to cut the electricity off from a cell tower nearby. There have been no injuries, and local firefighters said they would be free to go home, letting the fire burn controlled throughout the rest of the night.

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