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ONLY ON 3: State Supreme Court halts Judge Jolly's order; DA David can proceed with traffic court

READ MORE: ONLY ON 3: State Supreme Court halts Judge Jolly's order; DA David can proceed with traffic court
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BRUNSWICK COUNTY, NC (WWAY) -- Brunswick County District Attorney Jon David says he's ready to move forward with a traffic court program after the North Carolina Supreme Court decided in his favor earlier this month.

The Supreme Court amended an order between Judge Jerry Jolly and David a couple of weeks ago. Hidden in the legal jargon was the go ahead for StreetSafe. David says the Court temporarily lifted Jolly's order to end the driving improvement program. He says this decision stops the order until the Supreme Court hears his case later this year.

David told WWAY he called Judge Jolly's lawyer Thursday out of courtesy to let him know David will move forward in putting the StreetSafe program back into place.

For now, David says he does not have a timetable for when StreetSafe will be back, but he does consider the Supreme Court's decision a win.

David said he has not heard back from Judge Jolly or his attorney.

David says his brief is due back to the Supreme Court by July 15, and then Judge Jolly has 30 days to respond. The District Attorney says he is excited for the Supreme Court to hear the case and feels he has a strong argument, especially after the state legislature voted to make traffic programs like StreetSafe mandatory across the state starting October 1.

David says he believes the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in September or October.

Judge Jolly issued an order weeks ago stopping the program because he felt David was giving the director of StreetSafe a kick-back for donating less than $250 to his campaign for DA. David's system would allow the DA's office to send young drivers to StreetSafe, where they learn about how dangerous driving can be. It would also take them out of the day-to-day court system, freeing it up, David says, to deal with bigger issues besides traffic violations.

Law enforcement in Brunswick County also agreed with the program because they felt it would allow officers to spend more time on the streets and out of the courtrooms.

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