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Submitted by WWAY on Wed, 08/29/2007 - 5:41pm.

Two years ago Hurricane Katrina descended on the Gulf Coast. It was just the beginning of an epic ordeal that took 1,600 lives, shattered countless others. It also tore apart the geography of the entire region. Wednesday morning across New Orleans bells rang at 9:38 a.m. marking the moment two years ago the levees began to burst. From the lower Ninth Ward, Hurricane Katirina's "ground zero" President Bush reaffirmed his commitment to rebuilding New Orleans. Hurricane Katrina and the levee failures that followed left nearly 80 percent of New Orleans under water. The storm wiped out entire towns along the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Nearly 300,000 people have returned home to New Orleans. That's about two-thirds of the pre-Katrina population. But poorer sections of the City like the lower Ninth Ward are still desolate. New Orleans still does not have adequate levee protection -- and is not likely to get it for another five years. Given the risks, those who have come home, like Shannon Blue, whose house is far from being rebuilt, often think about leaving, but she stays, wanting to be part of the city's rebirth. Blue said, "At the end of the day I have the strength to go on because it's not just about me. It's not about me at all." By now you'd hope that most of the houses would be back to normal, but that's not the case. Thousands of people are still living in FEMA trailers, and two years out, the City is still very much a work in progress.

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