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tuition_hike300.jpg Submitted by Katie Harden on Fri, 02/10/2012 - 4:54pm.

WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) -- Higher education has a higher price tag. The University of North Carolina Board of Governors voted today to increase tuition for the next school year by more than nine percent. After news of about a nine-percent increase for the upcoming school year, students at UNCW say these tuition hikes are far from fair. "I saw 9.2 percent, and I was like, 'This is ridiculous,'" UNCW sophomore Mary Blackwelder said. Student Sadryne Hall said, "I knew it was coming, but I didn't know it was going to be a nine-percent increase. It was kind of like a low blow." "I love UNCW," sophomore Adam Grant said, "but it's kind of hard when they keep raising tuition on me, and I'm paying it myself." UNCW students say the 9.2 percent increase to tuition for the 2012-2013 school year means additional worries. "I was trying to do the math in my head about how much nine percent is, and it just blew me away," Blackwelder said. Here's how it adds up. Right now, in-state students pay more than $5,000, and out-of-state students pay more than $17,000. That means with the increase, in-state students will pay about $6,200, and out-of-state students will pay about $18,000. Students say they think there are going to be many effects of the increase for students and universities. "I may have to transfer back to my hometown, where I would be paying about $20,000 less each year," Grant said. "Community colleges are going to become a lot more popular, because they are so much cheaper," Blackwelder said. "I plan on paying back loans until I'm old," student Zac Saunders said. Melissa Heintz said, "That means a lot more peanut butter and jelly sandwiches for me." Students we talked with said they would participate in a protest if one was organized on campus. Students at other universities across the state have already organized demonstrations to show their opposition to the increase.

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