Info

They did look at the number of students. The diocese did a detailed investigation into the matter. The magic number was 50 I believe. They needed at least 50 families willing to commit to the school. They could not achieve this number. Another issue that in a high school like this is that you would have to start small, one grade at a time. There would be limited extracurricular activities to little or no sports. A lot of parents in high school are looking at the sports and clubs as an avenue to helping their child achieve acceptance into college. That alone would/could limit the number of students willing to commitment to a Catholic high school.

The other issue, in my opinion, is that people are afraid of their children learning Catholic Christian teachings. I think that would be an additional factor in limiting the pool of students willing to commit. A Catholic high school is not meant to be a “private” school, or just an alternative to a public school education, it is meant to be a place where parents can continue their children’s Catholic education and children can continue to learn and grow in Catholic teachings.

You also use the expression “reasonable tuition”, in order to provide the students with the best education possible, you would want to employ the most qualified teachers and staff. All of this cost money. Like commonsence said the days of Nuns and Priests staffing the schools at little to no cost are gone, sadly.

A lot of parents pray that one day Wilmington will have a Catholic high school. It is too late for my children; however, I think we will see that dream realized one day.

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

More information about formatting options

To prevent automated spam submissions leave this field empty.
CAPTCHA
Please re-enter the code shown in the image below.

Reply