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FootGolf_Meadowlands.jpg.jpg Submitted by John Rendleman on Thu, 07/10/2014 - 10:50pm.

CALABASH, NC (WWAY) -- FootGolf isn't the latest rage yet, but that's there's hope that it will catch on with golfers and soccer players at the Meadowlands Golf Club in Brunswick County. Public play is set to open this weekend for the newest sport in Calabash. Click the above icon in order to see WWAY's take on FootGolf. ---------- CALABASH (MEADOWLANDS GOLF CLUB) -- Meadowlands Golf Club has been accredited as a FootGolf facility by the American FootGolf League. The course debuts at 1pm, June 15 with an exhibition pro-am tournament featuring members of Myrtle Beach’s professional soccer team, Mutiny. The course opens to the public in July. FootGolf is played with a soccer ball and a 21” hole on the same course as regulation golf. The American FootGolf League introduced the sport of FootGolf in North America in 2011, according to their website at www.footgolf.net. The sport was recently featured on ABC's Good Morning America and NBC’s Today Show. Meadowlands FootGolf will open to the public in mid-July and will offer FootGolf seven days a week. The cost is anticipated to be $15 per player and ball rentals will be $5 or bring your own ball. Meadowlands joins three other NC courses operating with a FootGolf layout. They are in Charlotte, Rocky Mount and Buies Creek. Meadowlands will continue operation of its regulation 18-hole golf course. Additional info below from FootGolf.net Who invented FootGolf and when? The concept of FootGolf has been around since forever and almost everybody "invented" FootGolf somehow. Sports enthusiasts create different names ("soccergolf", "footballgolf", "kick-n-golf", "footy-golf", "footie", futbolgolf", "golfoot", and more to come!), it is played as a GAME in parks, farms, on the beach or even on the streets, using different kinds of balls or devices and under their own rules. In fact, there are more than thirty countries playing it as a game at different levels and with different rules. FootGolf as a SPORT is played with a regulation #5 soccer ball in 9 or 18 holes on golf courses. Courses become accredited and certified by the AFGL as an official FootGolf course in the US. The international rules apply at all the times. Twenty countries (the numbers started growing in 2011) are members of the FIFG and take it as a serious sport. Even more, most FootGolfers hope that FootGolf will become an Olympic sport in the next few decades. Where can I play? When can I play? In the United States, the AFGL uses golf courses only and FootGolf is played strictly under the rules of the FIFG. The American FootGolf League (AFGL) is contacting many of the sixteen thousand golf courses in the country with the intention of promoting the sport nationwide. Please visit the section "Courses" on this site to see the map of AFGL Accredited FootGolf Courses. Does the AFGL have an official membership? Golf Courses: The AFGL works with golf courses owners and operators, exclusively. State Associations:The AFGL affiliates state associations or organizations, only. The American FootGolf League has no local clubs or representatives. The AFGL is not accepting new applications for State Associations at this time. Member Players: AFGL membership packages for 2014 are not available at this time. The AFGL national handicap system, built in collaboration with a US company based in Georgia, passed its initial test in December 2013, it it still under development and being tested by a golf facility in Florida. The system will be reviewed by the AFGL advisory council in the first quarter of 2014, and presented to the board of directors of the FIFG for its final approval and implementation.

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