Congress passes new version of G.I. Bill

A full college education may soon be a reality for service men and women. Late last week Congress passed a new version of the famed G.I. Bill. The original G.I. Bill was passed after World War II and paid for eight million veterans to go to college. It expired in 1956. The new bill provides $50 billion over the next 10 years for soldiers like Carolina Beach resident Brian Smith to go to college. Smith has been serving since 2001 and toured 15 months in Iraq. If the bill is signed into law, he could be compensated for four years tuition, books and living expenses at any state university or college. "I believe everybody who served over there deserves college. It's tax money well spent, said Smith. The bill still needs to pass through the Senate and be signed by the President. North Carolina Congressman Mike McIntyre voted for the bill. He said it could be official as early as next week.

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This is pretty sweet. I already have a degree but I think I may get another after I get out. Plus I will actually be making more from the stipend than I do now as a corporal. I don't know how this could be any better unless they changed the rules to let me use the benefits to allow me to pay off pre-existing student loans. I believe this is going to make a lot of junior Marines go to college who otherwise may not have.
The new GI Bill sounds great. I have not been able to research the new educational benifits package, so I have a few questions still. One is, when a new president is elected how easy or hard would it be for them to exterminate the new GI Bill. Also, will the new bill cover tuition for veterans who served enough time post 9/11 to be covered under the new bill, but have already finished school or are about to finish school.