History of surfing the Cape Fear coast

A lot can change in 40 years -- the style, the technique -- but when it comes to surfing, one thing has stayed the same. "You are always looking for the perfect wave, and the perfect conditions to make the perfect wave," said Dennis Barbour, owner of Island True Value. Joseph "Skipper" Funderburg paints a picture of what it was like to surf the waters at Wrightsville and Carolina Beaches in his new book "Surfing on the Cape Fear Coast." "Both our agility and our dexterity, and our 'hot dogging' skills and tricks, just won a lot of hearts," said Funderburg. Funderburg said, "I am a caretaker of an incredibly valuable cultural resource, and the very best way, and most pervasive media to convey the information was through the beautiful surf book, 'Surfing on the Cape Fear Coast'." Although the surfing industry has evolved over the past forty-years, Funderburg hopes his book will send a message to the next generation of surfers. "The power of the water, one has to have great respect for what the sea is and what it can do," said Funderburg. The books were distributed to shops in Carolina Beach Friday May 30.

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