Man develops breast cancer

The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2007, more than 2,000 new cases will be diagnosed among men in the US. While breast cancer is a hundred times more common in women, many people don't realize that men also have breast tissue and can develop breast cancer. In 33 years of marriage Bill Morley always harbored a secret fear his wife would get breast cancer. After all, it ran in her family. Instead he was the one to receive the diagnosis. Morley said, "It was me. Where in the world did this come from?" Bill learned he had stage-four metastatic breast cancer in 2004. Morley said, "It's almost embarrassing, because to look back on it, I had a pain behind the nipple." Male breast cancer is not common in the US. The disease is 100 times more common among women. Like Morley, some men overlook the symptoms and delay going to the doctor -- ending up with cancer that has progressed to an advanced stage. Oncologist Mitchell Berger, M.D. said, "Not being aware of the risk of breast cancer they tend to let these masses grow a little bit more and also there is less tissue for it to grow into." Berger says the condition can leave men feeling isolated. "It's like being the only man in a sorority house: you are the only one with that condition," Berger said. Aging is an important risk factor for the development of breast cancer in men. Men with breast cancer are usually diagnosed around 67 years of age. Maintaining ideal body weight and restricting alcohol are the two most effective preventive measures.

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