Miley Cyrus to be filmed in Georgia instead of North Carolina
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Last week, Screen Gems pulled the plug on an announcement that a new Miley Cyrus movie would be filming in Wilmington. Now it appears the show will go on elsewhere. The switch could not only hurt the local film studio, but the caterers, make-up artists, and lighting companies that support the industry. Last week, Governor Bev Perdue was scheduled to announce the Disney movie the last song would be filming in North Carolina, but a spokesperson said it was premature to make the announcement. How right they were. Thursday Georgia Governor Sonny Perdue announced the Disney movie the last song will film in Georgia. Competition like this has North Carolina representatives looking to increase film incentives. In North Carolina, Disney would get a 15 percent tax credit. In Georgia, it could get up to 30 percent; producers will receive a 20 percent tax break, and an additional 10 percent if they include Georgia promotional logo. Georgia and North Carolina had been competing for the movie that will provide about 250 jobs. While North Carolina has considered raising film incentives, lawmakers aren't rushing into anything. In the mean time, the hearts of preteen girls can be heard breaking throughout the Port City. Not all supporting industries will be hurt by the move. Fincannon and Associates Casting, which has a partnership with Screen Gems, has been contacted to do the casting in Georgia, so the film could still provide a handful of jobs for Wilmingtonians; but no where near the 250 expected to go along with the film.

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What a disappointment it must have been for Gov Perdue to have to cancel her trip, which she had planned to make in order to take credit for landing the film. Then only to learn that it was her own state's high taxes (or lack of sufficient tax incentive) that made NC non-competitive for the business.