Mixed news for southern California

For much of southern California, there's mixed news. While there is some progress fighting the wildfires, some spots continue to burn out of control. Elsewhere, people are returning to their homes. The Santa Anna winds have all but vanished clearing the way for firefighters to get the upper hand. The wildfires have charred nearly half a million acres and 1,800 homes. Authorities suspect at least two of the fires, Santiago and Rosa fires, were deliberately set. Jess Morrison lost a home in fire. He said, "That's what angers me the most. Why would anybody want to do that? I hope they catch him." Qualcomm stadium, once sheltering more than 10,000, fire refugees will close Friday. Thousands of evacuees have been trickling back to their neighborhoods. Lucky ones, like Murray Davidson, found their homes still standing. Davidson said, "I'm sorry, this is so emotional, but anyhow, whatever the reason I guess I was just lucky, you know?" But the Baker family was not so fortunate. Their home, where they lived for 23 years, burnt to the ground. They are grateful for what they call small miracles, finding their family prayer book in rubble was one of them. The damage estimates are more than $1 billion. In San Diego County alone and the death toll continues to rise. Two bodies were found in the debris of a home Thursday and four more bodies at a migrant camp east of San Diego Thursday night.

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