NC Film Incentives: Asset or Liability?
filmincentive300.jpg

We hear a lot about the need for tax incentives to lure film projects to the state, but some critics say the incentives just don't make fiscal sense.

Contrary to popular belief, the film industry actually costs the state money. According to estimates from the state legislature, the current 25% film tax credit costs North Carolinian's 20 million dollars a year….and that figure is projected to rise 75 million dollars a year by 2013, if more projects come here to film. That's because our tax incentives are structured as refundable credits, and in many cases, the state actually writes film production companies a check for coming here.

Say a California based production company comes to North Carolina and spends 10 million dollars on a film. Since they don't actually owe taxes to North Carolina, the state would have to cut the company a check for $2.5 million, to cover the 25% incentive.

Proponents of film incentives say it's worth it, since films create jobs, and crews spend money in the cities where they're working. But critics say those jobs are temporary, and can be drawn away when a neighboring state introduces more generous incentives.

While the film industry certainly has a certain "cool" factor, it may be hard to justify spending 20 million dollars a year on incentives, especially in a time when the state may have to lay off teachers because of budget constraints.

Because state budgets are stretched so thin, some states are re-thinking their film incentive programs, but here North Carolina, legislators have actually introduced a bill to lift the caps on the current film incentives, making them more attractive to film makers, but more expensive for taxpayers.

Disclaimer: Comments posted on this, or any story are opinions of those people posting them, and not the views or opinions of WWAY NewsChannel 3, its management or employees. You can view our comment policy here.

Have you actually checked to see how much money these production companies and actors, crews etc. SPEND in the states they film in? I do not know the exact amount, but they spend a lot of money--food, gas, lumber to build sets,clothing, etc. Plus they eat at local restaurants, buy from local shops etc. and so what if the state pays them...Besides what I just mentioned, there are many people who work on these films as extras who are retired on fixed incomes and unemployed. I believe there are many more benefits than not. Do some more checking before posting the negatives of film production coming to our state. I think if you check with them, Georgia would disagree with many of they negative reasons you mention!

We need this. I am a crew member fighting for my lively hood here and I am not alone. NC was ranked #3 in the Country for Film but because of lack of understanding as this comment before me we are losing our status and our jobs. I don't understand how we as a nation have no problem with our gov't giving incentives for Large Corporation to take their companies out of the Country but to give one on the only big money making business' incentive to stay in our state is such a bad thing???
I work as a buyer on features and I can tell you how much you lose by not filming in NC. We spend so much in so many areas it is unreal! All benefit and we sometimes keep small local business's in business just by filming there.
Louisiana and Michigan and Georgia are at their max-unfortunately we are not keeping up with them- we need not surpass them but we must bring our incentive plan equal and competitive to theirs....the caps are killing us!!!!! I have so many colleges losing their jobs and leaving the state because we have lost our jobs. Please fight for us and help us bring in the jobs and bring back the the industry- Film is one of the few jobs still done in the US don't lose this too! I need my job I need to work- I love to work please do not put me on unemployment.

NC can be #3 again and flourish. Everyone wins- I can give you a 'H-U-G-E' list of venders who would agree with me who depend on this.
Please keep us working and don't take away our jobs- compete and make NC a better place to be.

The film industry IS different from the others, in that they choose WHERE they want to film. So whether the film maker shoots here or in Romania is up to them (sic "Cold Mountain").

As with all things in this world, money is most important. So the incentives are vital to the industry that's been built here over the last three decades, if we want to keep it. Let's see--they've taken away furniture, textiles, tobacco, you name it! Should we let them take away film/TV without a fight? No.

We were the # 1 "On Location" site for many years because of the hard work done here to build the industry. It has only been in the last decade that other states have wanted a piece of the film industry pie. We already have the infrastructure (studios, crew people, supporting businesses, etc.) right here. Let's keep this industry, shall we?

This bidding war is insane, and anyone can see the film industry's true motive - eventual tax-free status for anything associated with a production.

If we remove our caps or increase our incentives, within six months Georgia, Canada, or Louisiana has called and raised. So we respond in a couple of years with larger incentives?

The film industry does not provide so much that we have to submit to their blackmail.

OK, for all the people out there stirring the pot... listen up for the last time!!!

The Film Incentive doesn't cost a dime out of the taxpayers dollar. It is a REBATE!!! The film production has to pay 100% of the taxes to the state it owes only once they have been verified by the state does the state return to them 25% of that 100% in the form of a check. It is easy to see that they the state is spending money because it has to write a check, but the money it is paying back is ALREADY in the system. If we can have the economic growth that GA is experiencing 1.5 Billion a year!!!! Why not give an incentive to lure them to NC. The truth is if this doesn't work you don't have to worry about anything because if they are making movies then they aren't getting rebates!!!

I'm seriously shocked how little people know of this, and how quickly they are to act like they are the authority. I have been working in the Film business for the last seven years. I moved here from out of state. I pay taxes here. I bought a house here last year. I'm no better than the person working at Corning, PPD, or GE. I work hard for my money in a profession I love. As an objective tax payer looking at the incentives I see it as a win win. The film gets a thank you for bringing there temp. business to our state, and the state gets 75% of taxes on a production that could have easily have filmed in GA. It is an unfortunate necessity that the state must do in order to bring in millions of dollars.

For the individuals who like to bad mouth the film crew with your BOO WHOO;s, and your Carney jokes... let me break it down for you... We work in a tough, fast paced industry. Most people can't handle it. We are college educated individuals , and probably your neighbors. We pay taxes, and spend our money locally just as you do. Our money is just as green as yours. We aren't moving any where because we have every right to the American dream as everyone else.

Lastly, I'm all for the voice of the people, and everyone should be able to voice there thoughts in a public venue. But I strongly suggest that you know what you are talking about before doing so. Learn the facts!!!!!

You are about 110% WRONG. It is a REFUNDABLE TAX CRDEIT; Look up the difference between a refundable tax credit and a rebate. The refundable tax credit is a check FUNDED BY THE TAXPAYER written by the government for 25% of the PRODUCTION COST, not 25% back on any taxes they may have to pay. Get it? 25% of the production cost. Look. it. up. It is a refundable tax credit NOT a rebate.
And here is what that means, for all of you who seem to need help figuring out how much of our money they are squandering:
-"lobbyist Don Beason, whose services were procured by the North Carolina Production Alliance for $50,000 in 2005. Beason helped the movie producers win the blessing of the legislature for a refundable tax credit equaling 15-percent of production expenses up to a maximum of $7.5 million. Since a refundable tax credit means that the taxpayer gets money back regardless of whether or not taxes are owed, the new cap allowed movie studios to become firmly ensconced in North Carolina’s climate of corporate entitlement, pocketing over $15 million in the last three years alone. "

When the tobacco industry shut down, the textile industry kaput, the furniture industry left tens of thousands unemployed no one cried to give the unions and bosses money.

I have the solution to the Louisianas and such, no one leave to work there. Let the producers find talented crew elsewhere, they cant. I mean come on, when was the last time Screen Germs did a movie in Wilmington? Never. They are a facility, lease walls and equipment, they are based in NY. Now they are investing in Georgia, there is no loyalty in business.

Also look why Dino came here and started all this mess, low wages, non union, ignorant and gullible community.

Most everyone I know that works in the film business spend half the year on unemployment anyways, they suck the coffers dry everywhere they go and ask for more.

Get a job or move.

You are soooooo wrong it does not justify trying to explain anything to you.

Ok. So lets just take a look here.....

GEORGIA:
To further demonstrate the growth of this industry in Georgia, figures from FY '08-'09 show the following (updated 8/09):

Television networks, Hollywood studios, production companies and independent producers invested more than $647 million in Georgia
The economic impact of this investment was $1.15 billion
20 industry supply-chain companies have recently located to Georgia

LOUISIANA:
The staff of LED's Entertainment Office are working to develop and cultivate a new economic sector in the state - Louisiana's entertainment industry. The state's entertainment incentives are designed to fuel long-term investment that capitalizes on Louisiana's native creative culture. Since 2002, when the first tax credits were introduced, the incentives have generated more than $2 billion in new revenue and spurred creation of thousands of high-wage jobs, state-of-the-art infrastructure development and new business opportunities.

LED uses a holistic and innovative approach by offering incentives, workforce training and other economic development programs among four different entertainment industry sectors: motion picture, sound recording, interactive and live performance

FLORIDA:
Headlines Today: June 4, 2010

GOVERNOR CRIST SIGNS SB1752, ESTABLISHES 5-YEAR $242 MILLION TRANSFERRABLE TAX CREDIT PROGRAM
SB 1752 creates a five-year, $242 million transferable tax credit incentive program for Florida’s Film and Entertainment industry. Information about the new incentive program is currently available online at http://www.filminflorida.com/ifi/incentives.asp. more...

Get the picture??

I am Wilmington based film industry professional. I am currently unemployed in my profesional field and have been since last year. I am in danger of foreclosure, I am just "getting by" week to week as are hundreds of others in Wilmington's film community, and there is NO potential full time employment coming to our area. Almost everyone I know locally who IS employed in the film / tv industry at this moment is working out of state. They are spending their money and their taxes (and months at a time away from families) in OTHER STATES. Those of us who aren't as lucky... well, as for myself, I have 8 copies of my resume circulating in Georgia and 16 copies in Louisiana, all for different film projects.
It is definitely not for lack of effort.

It is of VAST importance to note here that a large number of those films would be in Wilmington, NC right now if it weren't for the current NC Film Tax Incentive. It is loaded with restrictions, monetary caps, spending caps and foolish financial wording levied against the production companies who in fact DO WANT TO COME HERE. They have passed us by due to the problems with our incentive program. The NC Film Tax Incentive package is simply COSTING US JOBS.

Therefore, by no fault of our own, film industry residents of Wilmington and nearby cities are becoming part of the socio-economical problems of NC by becoming unemployment statistics, by drawing unemployment wages, by facing loan defaults, by home and auto foreclosures/repossessions, and by lack of returning money into the local and regional economies because WE CAN'T. We simply can not afford to if there is no work in our industry.

Now, drive this point further, pick up any local or regional publication relating to tourism in the immediate area. First and foremost you will see advertised the film / tv industry. Followed by the beaches, restaurants, the arts, etc... It all looks great on paper, the mystique of Hollywood, the actors visiting, high dollar lifestyles, the rich and famous visiting our city and such, but is that what we have become? A state full of "paper cities" ??
If you agree that Wilmington is just a "paper city" then simply sit by, do nothing, and maybe the problems noted here will just go away. However, I am certain that you know someone living in Wilmington who is negatively affected by the loss of the Film industry. It a loss of jobs, of incomes, of pursuit of livleyhoods, of possibilities and of stable futures for hundreds and hundreds of professionals as well as hundreds of local businesses who reap huge rewards from film production spending. Millions of dollars to local businesses. Ask any business owner you know if they would like to triple their business incomes six to eight months of the year and they will most decidedly say yes.

When we are unemployed, just as anyone else in any other profession, we lose health care, retirement, pensions, and financial ability. This means local business economy suffers, meaning more new taxes, higher prices of products and more corporate retail chains putting local owners out of business.

So what now??? Please read again the article printed in the Star News, then this retort, and hopefully pass along to everyone you know, especially local and state political officials. Your community needs your help. Bring our residents home to their families and support a huge majority of what once was and could again be a florishing, financially profitable, NEEDED source of revenue for NC.

The film industry IS
Submitted by Ava Fan (not verified) on Mon, 06/07/2010 - 9:31am.
The film industry IS different from the others, in that they choose WHERE they want to film. So whether the film maker shoots here or in Romania is up to them (sic "Cold Mountain").

As with all things in this world, money is most important. So the incentives are vital to the industry that's been built here over the last three decades, if we want to keep it. Let's see--they've taken away furniture, textiles, tobacco, you name it! Should we let them take away film/TV without a fight? No.

We were the # 1 "On Location" site for many years because of the hard work done here to build the industry. It has only been in the last decade that other states have wanted a piece of the film industry pie. We already have the infrastructure (studios, crew people, supporting businesses, etc.) right here. Let's keep this industry, shall we?

» reply

Boo. Hoo.

What a mature and intelligent response! WOW!

Well gee, I guess "BOO HOO" guy must be a banker, Wall Streeter or a public "servant", seemingly not giving a care about a well formed and articulate argument about the benefits of the film industry to the local economy in Wilmington's environs.

My compliments to Governor Perdue and Mr. Griffith for their efforts to keep this industry productive and alive here is SE North Carolina.

First, you have made no reply to any of the questions I raised concerning the impact of the industry on the local or state economy.

Back it up with some facts.

Based on al which has been published, the movie industry is heading south as in Georgia. They don't make the kind of investment they have announced in Georgia unless they have some serious plans.

Second, you must be Mr. Griffith or the Governor. For only one of you could make the kind of self serving nonsense commending those parties.

What have either party done to keep the industry alive?

Frankly, perception is reality.

And it appears both parties were caught flat footed when the Georgia announcement was made.

And, the Governor had egg all over her face when she came to Wilmington to announce the Miley movie only to learn as she was stepping up to the mike that the project went south.

And frankly, Mr. Griffith has yet to state publicly whether he was part of the Governor's 23 person entourage when she jetted off to Hollywood.

And why would the Governor have to jet to California to learn the current film incentives are ineffective if Mr. Griffith is doing his job.

And, Mr. Griffith has yet to explain how an ineffective bill could be signed into law, last year, without comments from him concerning the benefit caps.

Ready to step up to the plate now, Mr. Griffith?

If not, perhaps the City should consider no financial support during tough economic times.

Success yields rewards and perks. Show the local populace specific success you have brought in. OR, give up the rewards, perks, and salary.

Tom,

Let me correct you on a major point: I am neither Governor Perdue or Mr. Griffith, nor am I personally affiliated with or known to EITHER.

I am, however an investor in a film project which by economic necessity is going to Louisiana. We tried to make it happen in NC but I had to go where the money and backing was.

Keep in mind that if our project succeeds, I and my investors will be paying NC taxes on our income.

I kind of wonder whether you are not Richard Burr... I think you may be frustrated that you can't outsource the film industry to China in order to line your pockets.

I reiterate my earlier praise to Gov. Perdue and Mr. Griffith.

again, like so many posts, there is a run, dash, and jump rather than a statement of facts.

It's real simple, show me the money so to speak.

What specifically have the Governor or Mr. Griffith done to keep the industry alive in NC?

That seems to be a pretty simple question.

I asked other questions as well concerning Mr. Griffith and his failure to perform. I won't bother to repeat them here as you clearly do not want to address specific questions with specific answers.

By your own statement, you and other investors are backing a movie project which went to Louisiana rather than here in NC.

Having said that, how can you in all candor supply such empty support for a Governor and a film promotor who failed in their job?

Face it, they failed. What was the last major project in NC? If there's been one since Nights in Rodantthe, please name it.

You know, it's real easy to shut someone like me up. Support what you say with facts and not a bunch of empty rhetoric.

What does Richard Burr have to do with all of this?

As to China, I'm the guy who proposed bringing Hummer here to eastern NC, when GM shut it down, and begin production with Chinese funding brought in by the Governor from her fund raising and business promoting 10 day junket over there last year. After all, the Governor you are praising spent all that time over there; have not seen anything develop from her relationship building trips.

That would have put a goodly number of North Carolinians to work and the Chinese executives could have purchased some of the over priced NC real estate. A win-win all around.

Bottom line, say something truthful, succesful, and verifiable she or Griffith have done in the past 2 years to promote movie making. Just one will do.

Tom,

You find it easy to call opponent's arguments "empty rhetoric". I already gave you a cite in another thread on the lost Miley Cyrus project including the efforts of Mr. Griffith. Here it is again if you are interested:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Last_Song_(film)

Toward the end of the article under "Filming" you will find an account called "Moving to Georgia" to quote in part:

"Georgia officials predict a lasting effect on the economy.[51] In addition, The Last Song is estimated to have brought up to 500 summer jobs[48] to Georgia, $8 million to local businesses,[53] and $17.5 million to state businesses."

As to my "Burr" quip, it was only intended to be a nasty retort to your claim that I am either Perdue or Griffith.

you fail to provide fact despite your claim that you are a movie investor.

Be specific rather than laying out some thread from a Miley movie.

On a $20,000,000 movie budget, if the state were to write a check for $5,000,000 as incentive, what is the specific impact on the local economy.

That's about as simple as I can make it.

And, again, I ask name a major project which has been done in NC since Nights in Rodanthe.

Another simple question to answer.

Please enlighten us with something other than empty thetoric.

To: Tom

Projects since "Nights in Rodanthe"

Bolden -- offices to be opened for additional shooting... projected release in 2011.

One Tree Hill -- Renewed for 8th season

Playing With Guns -- in post production, tv series waiting for pick up.

A Box For Rob -- Late spring start, Charlotte area.

Witness Insecurity -- Late spring start, Charlotte area.

As to the Miley Cyrus "The Last Song" article, NOT THREAD that I quoted.... take it or leave it... Georgia officials are quoted in the article attesting to the positive state and local impact of the production.

Best regards...

Tom,

Since Nights in Rodanthe there have been more projects namely "One Tree Hill", "The Fifth Quarter"(Winston Salem), "Main Street"(Durham) and "Provinces Of Night"(Wilmington). Also a movie in Charlotte called "The Trail", and one currently being filmed near Charlotte "Witness Insecurity".

Many of you don't know about the films that come here to film in the western part of the state or even the Triad. You have tunnel vision for what just comes to Wilmington. What you probably don't know is that I work for a company that has rented equipment to all of these films and the company is in Wilmington. More projects over $250,000 are filmed in this state than advertised.

As for the money side of things... WWAY is wrong and if you read the article again it says refundable credit.... well that would mean they had to pay 100% in order for it to be called a refund... Am I correct? The production has to pay there taxes. If there production company is out of state they have to set-up offices in our state in order to film here those offices are taxed within the state of NC. They have to pay 100% of the taxes to the state it owes. Only after they have been verified by the state can they receive 25% of the 100% back. NO MONEY FROM THE TAXPAYER!!!

However the City, and State does fund the film commission's. So that is taxpayer dollars to be truthful.

Back to your question about the 20 million dollar budget. Lets say of that 20 million 15 million is spent in the state. So they pay NC taxes on 15 Million dollars which comes out to 1.2 million in taxes. They pay the entire 1.2 million in taxes to the state The other 13.8 million is spent on talent, and crew who will have to pay NC income tax. The rest of the money is spent on space rental, equipment, wood, furniture, supplies, etc. and the companies they get those items from pay NC taxes... if they purchase or rent something from out of state then they can't claim that amount on the refund.

The film wraps they get all of there receipts together and submit everything to the State only when the state has verified everything will they return 25% of the taxes they had already paid... So if you want to know how much money was brought to the state it would be the whole 15 million dollars...

The reason for the incentives is because if we want this money we have to lure them here. GA is playing a tough game, and for us to be competitive with them we must enhance our incentives. If this will bring in a lot of productions take people of un-employment, and bring millions to the state it is a no brainer. The only thing it is costing NC is the overhead of the state film office, and for Wilmington the film office here. Other than that it's just the time, and air we spend talking about it...

First, thank you for emlightening me on the math.

Second, I asked for a majo project. Did not see any listed.

Third, no one has yet addressed my questions over the performance of Mr. Griffin, the movie czar and his lack of effectiveness.

I have a solution to your problem. You can either move to where the jobs are or find another field to get it.

I am tried of my taxes being raised because the state gives money away to businesses. You have actors coming in here making millions and we are giving the film companies tax breaks. I think we should get a percentage of the profits.

Take my advise and move..

i moved here for the industry advertised by Wilmington in the first place smarta**. You obviously didnt read how beneficial it is to have this industry as an asset to ANY state. And do you not think if it were actually feasible to just "move" and have no concerns or recourses for family, real estate, moving expenses, children, pets, ties to the community from ten plus years of residency.... that we wouldn't just to get away from idiots like you. ??

of North Carolinians relocate annually. They face all of the challenges you mention. In an increasing number of cases, they pick up part or all of their relocation expenses. They have houses to sell; children's education to consider. I'm lost as to how pets enter the equation. Every time I relocated, they went in the back of the SUV.

Why should the movie industry be any different than every other industry in this area?

And frankly, given Screen Gem's recent move into Georgia, what more writing on the wall do you need to see?

What was the last Major -- an note I stress major -- project in NC? The only one which I can name is the Rodanthe proeject which had Richard Geer. Maybe I missed one; if I did please enlighten us.

The fact remains the Film Commission, which is heavily subsidized by the City, is not doing the job it should. Mr. Griffith - I think that's his name -- is paid around $120,000 a year to promote the file industry.

Is he doing an effective job?

I believe Nights in Rodanthe was filmed in 2008. Many should remember the egg foo yung all over the Governor when she came to Wilmington to announce the Miley project only to have that rug pulled out from under her the day she was set to announce the Project.

You talk about the benefits of having the film industry in "any" state. I wonder if you could expand on that with some specific examples.

I think it's called put up or close your bag of wind.

Just to repeat myself to another person who obviously didnt read the facts leading into the editorial.

Ok. So lets just take a look here.....

GEORGIA:
To further demonstrate the growth of this industry in Georgia, figures from FY '08-'09 show the following (updated 8/09):

Television networks, Hollywood studios, production companies and independent producers invested more than $647 million in Georgia
The economic impact of this investment was $1.15 billion
20 industry supply-chain companies have recently located to Georgia

LOUISIANA:
The staff of LED's Entertainment Office are working to develop and cultivate a new economic sector in the state - Louisiana's entertainment industry. The state's entertainment incentives are designed to fuel long-term investment that capitalizes on Louisiana's native creative culture. Since 2002, when the first tax credits were introduced, the incentives have generated more than $2 billion in new revenue and spurred creation of thousands of high-wage jobs, state-of-the-art infrastructure development and new business opportunities.

LED uses a holistic and innovative approach by offering incentives, workforce training and other economic development programs among four different entertainment industry sectors: motion picture, sound recording, interactive and live performance

FLORIDA:
Headlines Today: June 4, 2010

GOVERNOR CRIST SIGNS SB1752, ESTABLISHES 5-YEAR $242 MILLION TRANSFERRABLE TAX CREDIT PROGRAM
SB 1752 creates a five-year, $242 million transferable tax credit incentive program for Florida’s Film and Entertainment industry. Information about the new incentive program is currently available online at http://www.filminflorida.com/ifi/incentives.asp. more...

Get the picture??

I got the picture. Perhaps the problem is you're accustomed to dealing in pictures and forgot how to read.

My points have dealt with the ineffective performance of the Commission Guy, Mr. Griffith, who is paid over $120,000 per year and does not produce.

Fact -- the Governor sponsored a bill during the 2009 legislative session to increase film incentives. BUT, OH NO, no one picked up the caps on the amounts which could be paid thus rendering all that work useless according to some of the movie posters.

Where was Mr. Griffith during the legislative process.

Fact -- so the Governor loads up 23 of her cronies for a junket in Hollywood at the taxpayers' expense. 3 Days in Hollywood to learn the afore mentioned incentives were not effective due to the cap.

That was known last year. So why didn't the afore mentioned Mr. Griffith take the time to go to Raleigh and bring this to the legislature's attention last year?

Did he know? Did he care?

Was he a member of the Governor's 23 person entourage? Heaven to Betsey, if anyone in the entire state should have been on that junket, it would be he. Who better than he, with all his supposed contacts in the industry? But was he included? Easy yes or no answer.

Concerned, instead of jumping to conclusions; instead of displaying your ability to cut and paste; instead of clouding the issues, try reading my posts without emotion and then give direct answers to the direct questions I ask.

I hope the City Council asks those questions before they agree to pony up another $100,000 to support a guy who can not produce.

And again, for the record, what was the last Major production here in NC? Another easy question to answer.

Why am I not surprised no one can answer specific questions with direct answers? Must be a bunch of Democrats.

Kenny Powers isn't considered 'major'?? But, he's the greatest relief pitcher in history, and the man with the golden d..., uh unit.

boo-hoo. So any one whose industry can't support the jobs gets breaks and suddenly people are hired? If the market isn't there, change jobs or go to where the jobs are.

10 years is an investment when half the year for the past ten years you are collecting unemployment, and after ten years at this wonderful profession you are broke, house in foreclosure, mooching medical care, no money to move, AND you are dragging these kids down with you and you have the stones to complain about not giving multimillionaire fat cats from LA some of my money? Dude if you signed on with McDonalds ten years ago youd be making 40k a year, family insured with vacation time, sick leave and a secure job, but no, you wanted to follow a dream.

Oh wait, dont tell me, your wife is in the film business too... oh my god, Im right arent I?

It applies to ANYONE, ANYWHERE. If you can't find a job in your chosen career field, you change careers, move, or settle for whatever job you can get.

This constant bidding war between the states is idiotic. The goal of the industry is tax exempt status and they're going to keep playing one state against the other until they achieve that goal.

I'm all for telling them, "Sorry, no more." I can live without One Tree Hill blocking traffic on Front Street.