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ONLY ON 3: USS Gravely has close call with sailboat

READ MORE: ONLY ON 3: USS Gravely has close call with sailboat
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WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) -- ONLY ON 3... A close call as the USS Gravely headed out to the ocean yesterday.

Viewer Mark Todd shot this video of the Gravely as it headed down the Cape Fear River. As it neared Snow's Cut, a sailboat got a little too close. A Coast Guard boat escorting the Navy's newest destroyer closed in on the Kat Man 2 to keep it away and let the Gravely pass.

A Coast Guard spokesman said he does not know of any charges against the sailboat crew.

Disclaimer: Comments posted on this, or any story are opinions of those people posting them, and not the views or opinions of WWAY NewsChannel 3, its management or employees. You can view our comment policy here.

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I remember that day. I was

I remember that day. I was with my dad,(Mark Todd), and we kayaked from Brunswick County all the way to that island and waited for about 3 hours to film this. The sailboat was literally 5 feet from USS Gravely.

Sailboat King

Probably the same sailboat that likes to pass under the Isabel Holmes Bridge every morning during rush hour, forcing the bridge to go up and traffic to back up for miles. I guess all the peons in the world (including the US Navy) should stop and get out of the way of this very important “seaman.”

Gravely and sailboat

I cannot fathom a crew who had so little common sense and less skill. A tiny sailboat against a Navy ship?

The owner of the boat should be given a stiff fine for lacking basic skills of sailing and basic logic.
God help those who are so ignorant that they cannot steer clear of large vessels.

I saw this near catastrophe in person and still cannot believe the STUPIDITY.

Sailboat

It's true that the sailboat legally had right of way, but sometimes you have to use common sense. They had plenty of time to get out of the way. It took nearly 20 mins from the time I first saw the Gravely coming and the time it almost hit the sailboat. That is plenty of time to to get far enough out of the way. It don't really matter much who has the right of way, after you're dead.

What I don't understand is what was going on during the few minutes from the time the coast guard pulled up beside the sailboat to the time the Gravely almost hit it. I didn't keep the camera on them because I assumed that the coast guard was going to get them out of the way. They had plenty of time to move even after the coast guard pulled up to them. Were they arguing that they had right of way?

Again, sometimes you need to use common sense. I'm sure there are a lot of people that had the right of way that later wished they had used their right to get out of the way.

Right of way

I may be wrong here, but if the sail boat is under sail (not power by a motor) it has the right of way. Maybe, the Navy needs a stiff fine.

5. Who has the "right of way" on the water? The Navigation Rules convey a right-of-way only in one particular circumstance: to power-driven vessels proceeding downbound with a following current in narrow channels or fairways of the Great Lakes , Western Rivers, or other waters specified by regulation (Inland Rule 9(a)(ii)). Otherwise, power-driven vessels are to keep out of the way (Rule 18) and either give-way (Rule 16) or stand-on (Rule 17) to vessels not under command or restricted in their ability to maneuver, sailing vessels or vessels engaged in fishing, and, similarly vessels should avoid impeding the safe passage of a vessel constrained by her draft (Rule 18(d)), navigating a narrow channel (Rule 9) or traffic separation scheme (Rule 10). The Rules do not grant privileges they impose responsibilities and require precaution under all conditions and circumstances; no Rule exonerates any vessel from the consequences of neglect (Rule 2). Neglect, among other things, could be not maintaining a proper look-out (Rule 5), use of improper speed (Rule 6), not taking the appropriate actions to determine and avoid collision (Rule 7 & 8) or completely ignoring your responsibilities under the Rules.

The Rules do not grant

The Rules do not grant privileges they impose responsibilities and require precaution under all conditions and circumstances;no Rule exonerates any vessel from the consequences of neglect (Rule 2). Neglect, among other things, could be not maintaining a proper look-out (Rule 5), use of improper speed (Rule 6), not taking the appropriate actions to determine and avoid collision (Rule 7 & 8) or completely ignoring your responsibilities under the Rules.