Report: Some cancer deaths decline

According to a new national report deaths from some types of cancer are beginning to decline in the United States. Each year organizations, including the National Cancer Institute and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, deliver a joint report on cancer in the United States. This year's edition reveals that cancer death rates are decreasing faster than they were in the 1990s. Cancer deaths dropped by about two percent each year from 2002 to 2004, which is double the rate of 1 percent from 1993 to 2002. Doctors found improved survival in the majority of top cancers. For men, deaths declined in lung, prostate and colorectal cancer. Women experienced decreases in death from colorectal and breast cancers. Researchers say wider use of colonoscopies has improved early detection of colon cancer, leading to better survival. Advances in treatment have reduced breast cancer deaths, but doctors are concerned this progress could reverse because fewer women are now getting regular mammograms. Experts are also troubled by increases in liver cancer, which is likely due to frequent hepatitis infection in some minority populations, as well as rising levels of obesity and diabetes across the nation.

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