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Technology Helps Law Enforcement Agencies Communicate

READ MORE: Technology Helps Law Enforcement Agencies Communicate
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The New Hanover County District Attorney's office and local law enforcement are using some updated technology to learn more about repeat offenders. It's a computer program called Police 2 Police. Assistant District Attorney John David says he's been using the program for about two years. Asst. DA, John David: "knowledge is power and it's so important to share information about the agencies to find out the true picture of the individual you're dealing with." Both agencies still use the old software, NCIC, which is a national program that provides information like the nature of a suspects arrests, arrests dates, and the outcome of the case. The new software, however, is more detailed. It shows photos, and lists such information as police reports, including random run-ins with the law, as well as suspects acquaintances. The P2P software is optional, and not all counties in North Carolina have it, causing difficulty in communication across the state. For example, Kristal Hill who allegedly committed 14 similar fraudulent crimes across the state, and each time was only sentenced to probation. The differences in software could have played a part in Hill's punishment had each county been aware of her previous charges.

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Sounds like a lame excuse

Sounds like a lame excuse for lazy, overpaid DAs who don't want to research their cases. Have they ever heard of the internet? Gee, that's better than just doing nothing, isn't it? What do they care anyway; they still draw the same amount of money regardless of how much work they do. Shame on them!

You don't know

Umm, no. P2P as it is called is Internet based. It allows any officer of a participating agency to log on from any computer and run names to check police involvements. DA's can also run names in the system.