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TroubleShooters: Man charged extra $1,000 for delayed flight

READ MORE: TroubleShooters: Man charged extra $1,000 for delayed flight
A flight to New Jersey for his daughter's wedding turned into quite an expensive trip for one Wilmington man. After catching a deal on roundtrip tickets he got hit with a $1,000 charge after a problem forced him to delay his flight 24 hours. McKinley Hatcher flew to New Jersey in September to walk his daughter down the aisle. The night of the wedding his fiancée misplaced her purse. "In the purse was all of our identification, passport happened to be one of them," Hatcher said. The couple was scheduled to fly out the next day. The good news: someone turned the purse into the local police department. The bad news? Hatcher said, "The purse was locked up and only one person had the key and that person was off. So that forced us to stay an additional day." So right away Hatcher called US Airways to let them know about the problem. Hatcher said, "We made it quite clear that all we want to do was just extend the departure date by one day and they said it was going to be a $100 charge." But that's not what appeared on his credit card statement the following month. For each ticket the airline charged him $508. That's more than $1,000 to change the departure date by 24 hours. That's a far cry from the $240 he originally spent on each roundtrip ticket. Hatcher said, "I said, 'Ma'am, use common sense, you're charging me twice as much to come back and I'm still having to use the other half of the roundtrip ticket. I said it makes no sense. Use some kind of logic here.' They were not nice." A mound of paperwork shows everything Hatcher has done to try to resolve the problem himself. He disputed the charges with Citi, his credit card company, and he's tried to get the airline to help, to no avail. "It's a sad situation. I'm retired. I don't have the money to blow like this, I really don't," Hatcher said. We contacted a spokeswoman with US Airways. She says the airline waived the $100 fee for the couple, but that its standard policy to charge the difference in fare, which in this case was $508 each. Hatcher says the agent never him told about paying any difference in airfare. If the agent would have, he says he would have rented a car and driven back. He has a piece of advice: make sure you get the first and last name of a customer service agent if you're ever in a similar situation, so if you have to call back with a complaint, you know who told you what.

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Low Airline Fares

These low airline fares are a two edge sword. It's a great value if you stick to your original plans. But if you cannot travel as originally scheduled, some fares have no safety net. Since this was a documented "accident", maybe the airlines will bend the rules. I would be very upset if this happened to me, yet the airlines are not public transporation, and are in business to make money.

I would definately spend the

I would definately spend the extra money on an attorney. Something just doesn't look right about this. You would think the airline would fix it, just to save face