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ONLY ON 3: Jeweler uses car as carrot to keep kids in school

READ MORE: ONLY ON 3: Jeweler uses car as carrot to keep kids in school
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WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) -- The local jeweler who gained national attention after giving away thousands of dollars in jewelery is at it again. This time around Alan Perry is giving away a car to a high school senior.

Perry has become a familiar face on TV. His jewelery store's promotions have even gained national attention.

Many now know Perry as the guy who gave away more than $40,000 in jewelery after more than three inches of snow fell in Asheville Christmas Day. It was all part of his "Let it Snow" promotion.

Now Perry has a new promotion; this one targeted at high school students. Perry's goal is to get kids excited about school by giving them an opportunity to win a car. He got the idea while talking with his daughter, who happens to be a teacher.

"My daughter is a teacher at Wake Forest, and she's like, 'They need to make straight As,'" Perry said. "I'm like, 'No. The kids that make straight as are going to continue to make straight As. I want the kids that are making Cs and Ds and some Fs to pull them up to Cs and stay in school the whole year and get their high school diploma.' So what would make them do that? I thought every kid would like a brand new car, so that's where I came up with the idea."

The rules for Perry's Senior Pledge are fairly easy: Keep a C average, don't have an unexcused absence and stay out of trouble with the law.

"I definitely would have given up some of the wave days that I went surfing, skipping," recent high school grad Blake Bedson said.

Bedson and cody Biggs are recent Ashley High grads. They think perry's idea is awesome. They just wish they still had a chance at the new car.

"I would definitely sign up for it," Biggs said. "It sounds like something that is easy and doable"

Perry plans to give away other prizes besides a new car for this promotion. He's considering PCs and iPads as runner-up prizes.

So why would Perry's Emporium create a promotion for those who most likely can't afford the jewelery in the store? Perry says it's all about name recognition.

"I'm probably being a little bit selfish, because I figure in four or five years they'll be bridal customers or potential bridal customers," he said.

Perry has not decided what type of car he'll give away. He's hoping a local car dealership will step up and partner with him, donating a car as well. That way not just one but *two* students will win a new set of wheels.

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A "C" Average?

Alan, why accept mediocrity? At LEAST demand a "B." You're delivering a message that a "C' is great and totally acceptable.

Diploma needed.

This incentive is geared toward keeping children in school. A C average is the minimum requirement to get in to most colleges. This is something that many students will see as doable. Those who may want to just drop out may see this as a reason to complete their education. Not every child receives the push and encouragement to exceed and stay in school. Our children are our future and we need to start investing in them. I applaued Mr. Perry for doing this.

"C" Average

I think these kids have been failures for so long that they will consider mediocrity to be several steps up. It might even inspire them to become a "B" on their own once they get excited about their "C".

It may be that Mr. Perry wanted to put it within reach of these kids so that more students would sign up for the program. If you tell an "F" student that they have to make a "B", that might seem unattainable. But make it a "C", and it seems within their grasp.

I have to give credit to Mr. Perry. At least he's doing something to try to inspire these kids to do better.

I agree, it's a good idea

I just wish he'd set his sights a little higher. A "C" is nothing to be proud of. I'd make it a "B," minimum.

When my kids were in school they received a cash bonus for every "A." They received nothing for a "B", as that was the minimal standard expected of their "job."

A "C" resulted in punitive action. Lots more studying, lots less going out, lots more spot quizzes fron Dad.

C's

In high school it may matter between a "B" and a "C" to get into college, but when you get to college.... C's will get you a degree. Never had an employer ask what was your GPA, just do you have a degree and in what. However, I always put my 3.6gpa right next to my degree on my resume.

"C'S"

WELL!!AREN'T YOU THE LUCKY ONE. ALL KIDS ARE'NT THAT LUCKY. YOU WOULD'NT NEED ANY HELP. SOME KIDS DO. I AGREE WITH GUESTLEE.

The biggest help kids need...

...is a caring parent or two at home. No incentives or gifts can make up for a parent who doesn't actually RAISE the child and take an active rolle in his or her education.

BIGGEST HELP

SOME KIDS ARE'NT AS LUCKY AS OTHERS IN HAVING PARENTS OR SOMEONE WHO CARES.WOULD BE NICE IF THEY DID.

At least he IS delivering a message...

...and providing a little motivation for these kids. The message may not be optimum, but it's a heck of a lot better than 75% of the parents of these children do to motivate them!

You are right a "C" is

You are right a "C" is average, but the grade is not the point. He wants students to stay in school and out of trouble. If a student doesn't miss any days then it is very easy for them to maintain a "C" average. It is the unexcused absence that is going to catch most of the students up. I love it and wish I would have been given this chance when I was in HS.

from prior experience

in using cars as raffle items for charity fundraisers, the local dealer probably can not give the car away. Best option is to get the dealer to secure as much manufacturer incentive as possible and add the waiver of dealer profit to get a true net cost. Maybe one of the larger dealer groups like Stevenson or Hendrick has the pockets to do it for free; most likely do not in this economy.

Then too focus on a manufacturer which needs to rebuild a tarnished reputation due to recalls and he might have a pretty attractive price offered to him.