Fraternal twins with autism: Is risk in the womb?

CHICAGO (AP) -- Experts have blamed most of the risk for autism on inherited genes. Now one of the largest studies of twins and autism shifts the focus to the womb. It suggests that the mother's age and health may play a larger role than was thought.

The study found a higher-than-expected rate of autism in fraternal twins. Those are twins that aren't genetically identical and are more like regular siblings. But they do share their mother's womb for nine months.

The new study didn't try to determine what factors increase risk during pregnancy. But experts say they could include stress, diet, infections, a mother's age and medications.

The study was led by Stanford University researcher Dr. Joachim Hallmayer. It was published Monday in Archives of General Psychiatry

(Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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were the twins vaccinated? The increase of autism correlated with the increase in autism. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out what the cause is. Eat donuts, get fat.... get 8 vaccines in one day, get autism.

Sounds like you not only need to learn the difference between correlation and causation, but to read autism information published by credible medical professionals and not celebrities or people who lost their medical license for publishing false studies.

Correlation and causation? In my business you smell smoke and generally there is a fire. A kid gets a vaccine, immediately develops a fever, perhaps seizures and then stops talking, spins around in circles and hits his head on the floor, that is no coincidence, smells like smoke to me.

I dont need some salesman to tell me his product is safe, I ask the people that use it.

Vaccines are not, I repeat are NOT linked to autism.

Andrew Wakefield's study of 12 children was fraudulent and no such scientific evidence has been produced that links autism to vaccines. Today, his medical license has been revoked and he is no longer allowed to practice medicine. Now we have to undo all of his wrongdoing by spreading the message, which is, VACCINATE YOUR CHILDREN.

Read what the CDC says about vaccinating:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/why.htm

More information:

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/MedicineCuttingEdge/story?id=5720092&page=1

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,202445,00.html

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/201047.php

http://aquantumofknowledge.wordpress.com/2010/06/01/vaccines-and-autism-...

The only vaccine looked at as a cause for autism was the MMR. There have been no studies of the MMR administered with any other vaccine. Many children receive 6-8 vaccines on one visit. This question has not been answered according to the former head of the NIH.

"I think public health officials have been too quick to dismiss the hypothesis as 'irrational,' without sufficient studies of causation... without studying the population that got sick," Dr. Bernadine Healy, former head of the National Institutes of Health. "I have not seen major studies that focus on 300 kids who got autistic symptoms within a period of a few weeks of the vaccines."

Go ahead, you can vaccinate your child assuming the vaccines do not cause autism, but I would suggest reading the warning labels of these vaccines. Adverse reactions include brain injuries and death. They may not cause autism but they can and do cause many other life long problems.

Perhaps you need to reference the studies directly. First, Wakefield's study made no claims that autism was caused by vaccines. He claimed that vaccines caused gut problems such as colitis. Second there are many studies proving that vaccines cause brain injuries and even death in a few cases, might not find one that proves autism, but there are many that show serious injury and even death.

The MMR is the only vaccine looked at as a cause of autism and all the studies are funded by the manufacturer. It's called tobacco science.

There have been no studies of the MMR combined with any other vaccine. No studies done with how the vaccines interact with children with abnormal or mutated MTHR genes. No study looking at the combination of vaccines and over the counter pain medicine such as Tylenol. The studies have simply not been done.

Dr. Bernadine Healy is the former head of the National Institutes of
Health, and the most well-known medical voice yet to break with her
colleagues on the vaccine-autism question.

In an exclusive interview with CBS News, Healy said the question is
still open.

"I think that the public health officials have been too quick to
dismiss the hypothesis as irrational," Healy said.

"But public health officials have been saying they know, they've been
implying to the public there's enough evidence and they know it's not
causal," Attkisson said.

"I think you can't say that," Healy said. "You can't say that."

Healy goes on to say public health officials have intentionally
avoided researching whether subsets of children are “susceptible” to
vaccine side effects - afraid the answer will scare the public.

"You're saying that public health officials have turned their back on
a viable area of research largely because they're afraid of what might
be found?" Attkisson asked.

Healy said: "There is a completely expressed concern that they don't
want to pursue a hypothesis because that hypothesis could be damaging
to the public health community at large by scaring people. "First of
all," Healy said, "I think the public’s smarter than that. The public
values vaccines. But more importantly, I don’t think you should ever
turn your back on any scientific hypothesis because you’re afraid of
what it might show."

Logic win.

Logic fail.

"I think we now understand that both genetic and environmental factors have to be taken seriously," said Dr. Joachim Hallmayer, an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford and the lead author of the new study. "There has been growing acceptance that genes do not tell the whole story, in part because autism rates appear to have increased far faster than our genes can evolve."

"I was very surprised. The environmental influence is stronger than I thought," Hallmayer said. "It doesn't mean that genes don't play a role, but they may not play as big a role as thought."

Autism affects one out of every 58 boys. It is a brain injury that robs most of those diagnosed with the disorder of an independent life as an adult.