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ONLY ON 3: Marine Corps Osprey makes emergency landing at ILM

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WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) -- A V-22 Osprey from Marine Corps Air Station New River had to make an emergency landing at Wilmington International Airport this afternoon.

Airport officials say the pilot called in issues with the drive shaft. The tilt-rotor aircraft landed safely.

Ospreys have a checkered past, including fatal accidents that led to the whole fleet being grounded.

A spokeswoman for MCAS New River said the Osprey crew was conducting routine training in the area when they made the unscheduled landing. 1st Lt. Kristen Dalton said the pilot had full control of the aircraft. There were no injuries.

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Most V-22 Mishaps Hidden

The V-22 program has hidden most mishaps. The details on this scandal are here: http://www.g2mil.com/V-22mishaps2010-12.htm

The proprietor of the g2mil

The proprietor of the g2mil website is one Carlton Meyer. Meyer fancies himself an expert on all things military but in fact has no experience in tactical aviation and was in effect fired by the Marine Corps at the end of his initial contract. Meyer was caught trying to pass off fabricated congressional testimony as legitimate and as a result was banned from posting any information on the military.com forums once his fraud became public knowledge. Meyer has more experience running his wife's dental practice in El Cerrito, CA than he does in aviation.

Incidentally, information about V-22 mishaps is readily available from the Department of the Navy.

Anyone who puts any credence in anything posted at his website is a fool.

All planes go down

The actual safety record of the V-22 is superior to other rotor aircraft, even in testing. There have statistically been more Chinook, and CH-46 crashes than V-22. Huey as well. When any aircraft is involved in a crash anywhere in this country, the accident is investigated and if needed corrections are required to be made across the fleet. Prime example when a fire-fighting C-130 crashed last week, the fire-fighting fleet of C-130's was grounded. As in the V-22 fleet grounding, it is much easier to ground a fleet when there are very few airframes, as was the case at the time, than it is to ground a fleet of several thousand airframes. Why get rid of something that works?

Glad the pilot and aircrew made it to the ground safely. I imagine if there was a followup to this story we would find there was no issue that would prevent the aircraft from flying.

Quite possibly the reason

Quite possibly the reason for this is that there are many more Ch-46s and Hueys, compared to a handful of Ospreys.

The CH-46 experienced 44

The CH-46 experienced 44 Class A mishaps during it's first five years of service, including several that broke up in flight due to station 410 failures. No comparison whatsoever between the CH-46 and the Osprey. The difference is night and day.

"Even counting two crashes of Air Force CV-22Bs in the past two years, the Osprey's safety record has been exceptionally good since the aircraft was redesigned and retested a decade ago. Since Oct. 1, 2001, three Ospreys have crashed with a loss of six lives. During the same period, the U.S. military has lost 414 helicopters at a cost of 606 deaths." Richard Whittle 9 July 2012

http://defense.aol.com/2012/07/09/marines-peg-bad-flying-as-cause-of-apr...

Glad the pilot landed it

Glad the pilot landed it safely. He is one of the lucky ones.

PLANES FLY OVER MY HOUSE ALL

PLANES FLY OVER MY HOUSE ALL THE TIME. JETS, AIRLINES, OSPREYS AND SMALL PLANES FROM PILOTS RIDGE. THEY DON'T BOTHER ME. IF THEY COME DOWN, THATS UNFORTUNATE. HOW MANY HELICOPTERS AND 747S AND OTHER AIRLINERS HAVE COME DOWN? HOW MANY PLANES HAVE MADE EMERGENCY LANDINGS AT THE AIRPORT? SHOULD WE GROUND THEM TO? THE PLANE LANDED SAFELY. BE THANKFUL OF THAT

v-22

I agree enough of our men have died trying to get the damn thing to stay in the air. I guess we have invested so much money in it that now it's to late, we got to do what ever we have to do to make it a 100% sucess. Good luck, and God Bless!!

V/R
Jamie

They fly over all the time.

They fly over my house every day. After their past history, I am waiting for the day when a part or the whole plane comes crashing down. The plane needs to be grounded for good and go back to the Hueys or other rotor style aircraft.

Those days are long gone

Amphibious warfare changed irrevocably on 12 June 1982. On that day an Exocet missile was launched from an improvised trailer that even the Argentinians felt was an unreliable piece of junk. The missile struck HMS Glamorgan in her hanger deck, killing fourteen sailors and heavily damaging the ship. Had it not been for a stellar job of maneuvering by the officers and men of Glamorgan, she would have been hit broadside and likely suffered the same fates as HMS Sheffield or the USS Stark.

There was an instantaneous recognition in both Newport and Quantico that anti-ship missiles had rendered dry-nets and mike boats obsolete when assaulting a hostile shore. The amphibious group would have to maintain a respectable distance from the beach, and placing them so far offshore (OTH, over the horizon and out of radar coverage) meant that landing the first wave would be an all-day affair using the technology of the day. Unfortunately, a successful amphibious assault requires the RAPID build-up of power ashore.

LCUs were supplanted by LCACs, high-speed hovercraft, and the V-22 was developed from an older design that really had no purpose prior to the Falklands "revelation" and never went into production. We needed (desperately) to replace the old CH-46, and any replacement would have to move much faster to keep the assault moving and project seapower ashore quickly.

As far as the V-22 birthing problems, few aircraft roll out without a few bugs that need to be worked out. And yes, sometimes men die while those bugs are worked out, but they give their lives for this nation just the same as if they had died in battle. For example, I call your attention to the AV-8 Harrier. By 1975 there was a standing joke in the Marine Corps:

Q: How do you get your own Harrier?
A: Buy an acre of land in North Carolina and wait.

What we learned from the AV-8 however, led to the AV-8B and we then had a fantastic aircraft that has proven itself in close air support missions hundreds of times since then.

Rotary-wing aircraft still provide our heavy ship-to-shore lift (I'm sure CH-53Es fly over your home as well) but until you can design a rotary wing aircraft that can bring a platoon of Marines ashore at over 300 mph, the Osprey is our best hope.

Grounded

Thats the attidude that has gotten people and progress no where.Good thing thing the people who came up with the space shuttle didnt have that mentality or we still be shooting rockets up with monkeys in them.How about the thousand of hours and flights that haven't had problems