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WPD: Woman punches burglar in face, slams window on his hands

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WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) -– Wilmington Police are investigating after they say a mother punched a man in the face when he tried to break into her home through her child’s window Wednesday morning.

Police say just after 2:30 a.m. officers responded to 806 N. 30th Street after Karmara Smith, 26, called 911 to report a man trying to get into her home.

Investigators say Smith told dispatchers she punched the suspect in the face after she heard the window open in her 4-year-old’s room before she slammed the window down on his hands. Police say Smith told them she recognized the man from the Creekwood Community.

The suspect is described as a black male in his 20s, weighing about 150 pounds. Police say he was wearing a white t-shirt, grey pants, and black shoes at the time of the crime. He is wanted for first degree burglary.

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Was talking to a friend

Was talking to a friend about this exact problem and he said in Texas people have signs on their property with the state emblem and revolver pic which reads "We don't call 911" Pretty serious folks it would seem.

Great job! Maybe the WPD

Great job! Maybe the WPD could give her a job. Sounds like she's doing more to stop crime in her hood than they are.

Hypocrites!!

Oh sure, its ok for you to use excessive force, but let a cop do the same thing! Double standard??

What the heck are you

What the heck are you ranting about, dipstick? You must be totally brainless.

Just sayin....

So a cop stops a guy walking out of a business that is being robbed, who has a gun, orders him to stop, he raises his gun at the cop and is shot. Now there's uproar that it was excessive? And how is this not the same? People posting "should have shot him", but when a cop does, justifiably, he's called out as excessive?

According to the liberal, "totally brainless" in Wilm, this woman should have just called 911 and waited for proper response, NOT take action. This kid from creekwood probably just needs some correction and support from the community, not someone hurting him.

Hypocrites.

Well said! I'm glad it was

Well said! I'm glad it was resolved without loss of life or severe injury (had to chuckle at Just Me's comment though). Mostly newsworthy in that lethal force wasn't used but lets think of what had happened if it had been..

Everyone on both sides of the 2nd amendment would be chiming in with why this shows we should be able to have firearms or why we shouldn't.

The resident could face charges since the guy was never actually *in* the home.

Depending on the races involved it would be another media circus or just another story. (Yeah that's messed up, but sadly people like to play that card.)

Police arrive on the scene and then something else happens (be it the kid getting shot again for resisting or worse yet the resident as she still has the firearm and is likely scared to death and quite emotional at this point having just used lethal force..)

Resident NOT Subject To Charges

Your statement of "The resident could face charges since the guy was never actually *in* the home," is IGNORANT on it's face and it fact.

In 2012 the NC Legislature restored a Citizen's GOD given right to "Self Defense" with House Bill 650. If a person is in fear for their life, great bodily harm, or sexual assault they have the inherent right of self-defense. See paragraph b.1 & b.2 below:

§ 14-51.2. Home, workplace, and motor vehicle protection; presumption of fear of death or serious bodily harm.

(a) The following definitions apply in this section:

(1) Home. - A building or conveyance of any kind, to include its curtilage, whether the building or conveyance is temporary or permanent, mobile or immobile, which has a roof over it, including a tent, and is designed as a temporary or permanent residence.

(2) Law enforcement officer. - Any person employed or appointed as a full-time, part-time, or auxiliary law enforcement officer, correctional officer, probation officer, post-release supervision officer, or parole officer.

(3) Motor vehicle. - As defined in G.S. 20-4.01(23).

(4) Workplace. - A building or conveyance of any kind, whether the building or conveyance is temporary or permanent, mobile or immobile, which has a roof over it, including a tent, which is being used for commercial purposes.

(b) The lawful occupant of a home, motor vehicle, or workplace is presumed to have held a reasonable fear of imminent death or serious bodily harm to himself or herself or another when using defensive force that is intended or likely to cause death or serious bodily harm to another if both of the following apply:

(1) The person against whom the defensive force was used was in the process of unlawfully and forcefully entering, or had unlawfully and forcibly entered, a home, motor vehicle, or workplace, or if that person had removed or was attempting to remove another against that person's will from the home, motor vehicle, or workplace.

(2) The person who uses defensive force knew or had reason to believe that an unlawful and forcible entry or unlawful and forcible act was occurring or had occurred.

(c) The presumption set forth in subsection (b) of this section shall be rebuttable and does not apply in any of the following circumstances:

(1) The person against whom the defensive force is used has the right to be in or is a lawful resident of the home, motor vehicle, or workplace, such as an owner or lessee, and there is not an injunction for protection from domestic violence or a written pretrial supervision order of no contact against that person.

(2) The person sought to be removed from the home, motor vehicle, or workplace is a child or grandchild or is otherwise in the lawful custody or under the lawful guardianship of the person against whom the defensive force is used.

(3) The person who uses defensive force is engaged in, attempting to escape from, or using the home, motor vehicle, or workplace to further any criminal offense that involves the use or threat of physical force or violence against any individual.

(4) The person against whom the defensive force is used is a law enforcement officer or bail bondsman who enters or attempts to enter a home, motor vehicle, or workplace in the lawful performance of his or her official duties, and the officer or bail bondsman identified himself or herself in accordance with any applicable law or the person using force knew or reasonably should have known that the person entering or attempting to enter was a law enforcement officer or bail bondsman in the lawful performance of his or her official duties.

(5) The person against whom the defensive force is used (i) has discontinued all efforts to unlawfully and forcefully enter the home, motor vehicle, or workplace and (ii) has exited the home, motor vehicle, or workplace.

(d) A person who unlawfully and by force enters or attempts to enter a person's home, motor vehicle, or workplace is presumed to be doing so with the intent to commit an unlawful act involving force or violence.

(e) A person who uses force as permitted by this section is justified in using such force and is immune from civil or criminal liability for the use of such force, unless the person against whom force was used is a law enforcement officer or bail bondsman who was lawfully acting in the performance of his or her official duties and the officer or bail bondsman identified himself or herself in accordance with any applicable law or the person using force knew or reasonably should have known that the person was a law enforcement officer or bail bondsman in the lawful performance of his or her official duties.

(f) A lawful occupant within his or her home, motor vehicle, or workplace does not have a duty to retreat from an intruder in the circumstances described in this section.

(g) This section is not intended to repeal or limit any other defense that may exist under the common law. (2011-268, s. 1.)

He was in

If his fingers were hit by the closing window, he had crossed the threshold and was in the residence.

The "threshold" criteria for

The "threshold" criteria for self-defense no longer applies in NC.

I know

For some reason Rusty thinks because the person wasn't fully in the home the resident didn't have the right to protect themselves.

Outstanding. Good news.

Outstanding. Good news.

break in

Great job, but a bullet to his head would hzve been a better outcome

Awesome!

I had an aunt who lived in Atlanta, one day she was home and heard someone trying to get in through her kitchen window. She ran to kitchen and this guy had his head through and was trying to pull the rest of himself through. she grabbed a pot of brunswick stew that was simmering on the stove and dumped it over his head. The guy starting screaming and took off running. The cops found him a couple hours later at a hospital where he was being treated for 2nd and 3rd degree burns of his face and neck.

You go girl! Great job.

You go girl! Great job. Too bad she didn't have a gun and could have taken him out permanently.

Way to Go! Love it! Just go

Way to Go! Love it! Just go to Creekwood and look for the creep that has two broken hands and a black eye. LOL! So happy this Mom was able to stop this in mid-action! May God Bless you.