Rouzer recently got $1,000 donation from DuPont

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WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — The Congressman who represents southeastern North Carolina recently accepted a $1,000 donation from the company that originally began producing GenX along the Cape Fear River, but his campaign says the timing is a coincidence.

The campaign finance records for Rep. David Rouzer (R-7th District) show a $1,000 donation from the DuPont Good Government Fund June 30. DuPont was the original producer of GenX at the Fayetteville Works site along the Cumberland-Bladen county line before spinning off its performance chemicals division and creating the Chemours Company in 2015.

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Rouzer said he met with a representative of Chemours on June 20. That’s the same day the company announced it would stop releasing GenX into the river as state testing began.

“It’s important to note two things.  First, as a result of a spin-off which occurred in 2015, DuPont and Chemours are two separate and independent companies.  In other words, since that time, the business decisions related to the manufacturing of GenX, or the production of GenX as a byproduct, have strictly been those of Chemours — not DuPont,” Rouzer spokeswoman Danielle Smotkin said in a statement. “Secondly, the contribution by DuPont Good Government Fund was for a fundraising event on May 3. As customary with many PAC contributions, the actual check was cut and delivered to the campaign at the close of the quarter.  It is also instructive to note that all of DuPont’s second quarter contributions to congressional campaigns were made at the same time.”

The DuPont Good Government Fund in a political action committee (PAC) that has contributed to many members of Congress from both parties, as well as candidates for state and federal offices. Records show the PAC also donated $1,000 to Rouzer’s campaign fund in November 2015. Sen. Thom Tillis (R-North Carolina) received a $2,000 donation from the fund in March 2016.



A day after meeting with Chemours, Rouzer told WWAY GenX is a priority.

“I think the citizens of Southeastern North Carolina can take comfort in the fact that all the appropriate authorities at all the different levels are engaged and working to resolve the issue long term,” Rouzer said.

Smotkin says Rouzer’s office has been “in regular communication with all parties involved, including the EPA, NCDEQ, NC HHS, Chemours, as well as local and state officials, in order to help bring all the facts to light and address all related concerns.”