ER visits for COVID-19 symptoms dip to lowest level since earliest days of pandemic

The rate at which people visit emergency rooms with COVID-like symptoms was at just 2 percent for the week ending March 12, the state Department of Health and Human Services said Thursday.
(Photo: CDC)

RALEIGH, N.C. (WNCN) — A key COVID-19 indicator has dipped to its lowest level in North Carolina since the earliest days of the pandemic.

The rate at which people visit emergency rooms with COVID-like symptoms was at just 2 percent for the week ending March 12, the state Department of Health and Human Services said Thursday.

That rate is considered one of the earliest indicators of a potential rise in cases, and is one of the seven measures the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services will continue to track once it switches from daily to weekly updates on March 23.

That drop came as the number of new breakthrough COVID-19 cases dropped, with the agency reporting roughly 7,000 new post-vaccination cases between Feb. 27 and March 5. Nearly 20,000 breakthrough cases were reported the week before.

The 546,598 cumulative breakthrough cases mean nearly 9 percent of the state’s 6.1 million fully vaccinated people have reported one. The weekly report does not specify how many of those vaccinated people also were boosted.

You can read more here. 

Courtesy: NC DETECT

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