Red Cross deploys Cape Fear official to provide aid in Kentucky

The City of Mayfield, Kentucky is still working to recover after deadly tornados ripped through the midwest earlier this month and volunteers have come from near and far to provide relief. 

MAYFIELD, KY (WWAY) — The City of Mayfield, Kentucky is still working to recover after deadly tornados ripped through the midwest earlier this month and volunteers have come from near and far to provide relief.

The American Red Cross has transformed the Kentucky Dam State Park into its headquarters, just outside of Mayfield where the tornados ravaged homes and businesses.

“When I served in the marines for 20 years, we’d run to the sound of gunfire,” James Jarvis said. “The same thing is true for Red Crossers, they run to help people in need so I’m just really honored and humbled to be here.”

Jarvis, Executive Director of the Cape Fear Area Red Cross, arrived there on Tuesday evening to work with elected officials in three surrounding counties to make sure as needs are identified, they are met as soon as possible.

​”Make sure that they have safe housing over their heads, making sure they have food. Working very closely with FEMA to make sure that they get registered for the assistance. Then working with the community partners who are here that whatever we can do to meet their needs, we want to do that,” Jarvis said.

Earlier this month, two other men from the Cape Fear Area deployed to volunteer with the Red Cross in Kentucky, spending two weeks providing aid in various ways. The timing of the disaster meant the volunteers would miss Christmas with their families, but WWAY spoke to volunteer Gene Pavone of Brunswick County who said there was no place he’d rather be than helping others for the holiday.

With a growing concern for the omicron variant of COVID-19, Jarvis says they are taking precautions and all volunteers must be vaccinated before they are deployed to provide aid.

“We’re going to take it one step at a time, one day at a time, but at the end of the day people need us and that’s why we’re here,” Jarvis said.

Even before the disaster, Jarvis says we are in a 10-year low blood supply across the country. For information on how to donate blood, visit here. 

If you would like to donate monetarily or find information on how to volunteer, visit here.

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